INDEX

VOL 28 —WHAT IS HISTORY?

and other Late Unpublished Writings


Abel-Remusat: on cultural diffusion,
    41
Abraham: 43; Exodus from Ur, 19
Achaemenian empire, 16
Achaemenid expansion, 37
Aditya, 96
Aeschylus: and theomorphism of soul,
    27; Prometheus, 80, 226
Age of Reason, 92, 138
Ages of World: in Hesiod, 72
Aggregate of symbolisms: as equiva-
    lent to a philosophy of being, 72-75
Agnoia (ignorance), 102
Aition: as ground or cause, 89
Akh-en-Aton, 24, 42, 214
Alasha Hoyuk, 192
Alcibiades, 32
Aletheia (truth-reality): principal pas-
    sage on in Aristotle, 109; double
    meaning of, 114
Alexander: 17, 56; and conquest of
    Persia, 19; drive for empire, 31-32;
    conquest marks an epoch, 37; cos-
    mic religion, 67
Allegoresis: Midrashic, 182; philo-
    sophical, of Philo, 182; Christian
    philosophical, of the Patres, 182
Altizer, Thomas, xxviiin
Amon, 60
Amon Hymns, 214, 216, 223
Amon-Re, 69
Amphictyonic Leagues, 26
Analogy of being, 75
Anaximander, 227
Anaximandrian symbolism of the
Apeiron: Plato's image of Being be-
    fore the event, 221
Anima animi, 5
Anselm, Saint: xxix, xxxvi, 191-206
    passim; De Fide Trinitatis et de In-
    carnatione Verbi,
194n1; Pros-
    logion,
analyzed, 192-206; Mono-
    logion,
196
Anselm-Gaunilo debate, 200
Anthropogony: classed with histo-
    riogenesis, 53; forming aggregate
    with theogony, cosmogony, and his-
    toriogenesis, 72-75; in Hesiodian
    Ages of the World, 72
Anthropomorphic conception: in
    China, 28
Anu, 95
Anxiety: discussed, 58, 61-63, 66-68,
70; and search of order, 70; search of
ground as response to, 74; responds
to diversions, 83; assuaged by acts of
symbolization, 87; response pro-
voked by non-cognitive awareness of
existence out of nothing, 89; no
exact equivalent in Greek language,
102; related to cosmogonic question
in Aristotle, 103
Apeiron, 221
Apocalypse: as symbolic form, 14;
    Jewish, 59; modern equivalents of,
    66; immanentist forms of, 82
    Apocalypse of Abraham: discussed, 4;
    quoted and analyzed, 96-98; as
    pneumatic meditation, compared to
    Aristotle's noetic meditation, 104
Apocalyptic sects, 31
Aquinas, Saint Thomas: xxix, xxxvi,
    177, 192, 210; concept of deifor-
    mitas,
227
Arche (beginning): as first cause origin,
    beginning, or ground, 5, 89, 107; in
    speculation on origins in Ionian phi-
    losophers, 52, 57; equivalents of cos-
    mological and philosophical
    speculation on, 74; in Aristotle,
    107-108
Aristotle: xxii, 131, 153, 170, 176, 178,
187, 198, 224; reception in Middle
Ages, 7; cyclical time in Problemata
discussed, 64; increase of cos-
mological awareness, 67; Nous and
First Cause in Macrobius, 77; con-
ception of life of reason, 90; homo-
noia
in, 90; philosophic life, 92; use
of term theology, 99, 107; Meta-
physics
texts discussed and exegesis
given, 99-110; Metaphysics I as
new symbolism to establish con-
tinuum of noetic search, 101; Meta-
physics
as lasting arsenal in defense
of reason, 101-102; Platonic educa-
tion, 106; Nichomachean Ethics,
108; Politics, 108; passage from
Metaphysics cited at end of Hegel's
Enzyklopädie, 150-51; philosophiz-
ing as athanatizein, 225
Arrianus: Indika, 18
Assyrian empire, 32
Athenian empire, 16
Athens: and transfer of authority, 48
Attunement to divine being: discov-
    ered in experience of transcendence,
    21
Augustine, Saint: xxviin19, 32, 75,
    139, 153, 204, 224; amor Dei and
    amor sui, 32; analysis of internal re-
    flection in De vera religione XXXIX,
    175; on illumination, 195
Augustus, 37
Axial time: core of truth in, 46

Babylon: expansion of, 17; conquest of
    by Persians, 17
Babylonian Prayer: "to whom it may
    concern, " 70-71; compared to im-
    age in T. S. Eliot, 85
Barth, Karl, 192-93
Beginning: symbol indicating direction
    of questing movement, 173-74;
    conflict between God of Beginning
    and God of Beyond, 211
Behistun Inscription, 59
Being: in Parmenides' speculation, 2;
differentiated and endowed with in-
dices, 5; discussion of several modes
and meanings of, 207, 209; language
of and its aggregages of meaning,
218-20; complications in the lan-
guage of, 220; new symbolism of
Eminent Being, 232n4
Bergson, Henri: and open soul, 5;
    Deux Sources de la morale et de la
    réligion,
41; opening and closing of
    vistas, 57
Berossus: Babyloniaka, 20; and histor-
    iogenesis, 56
Beyond: divine Beyond same as divine
Within, 5; of the experiencing soul,
21; symbol indicating direction of
questing movement, 173-74; con-
flict between God of Beyond and
God of Beginning, 211; of the cos-
mos in Plato's Republic, 217; ana-
lytically inseparable from act in
which it becomes "visible, " 218; im-
mortalizing presence in act of medi-
tation, 221
Bhagavad Gita, 223
Bible:
—Genesis, Book of: 176, 185; and
    Schiller's deformation of Fall of
    man, 123
—Exodus: 4: 22, quoted, 24; 3 (Thorn-
    bush Episode), 98, 186
—Judges: Book of, 67
—2 Samuel: 9, p. 15
—I Kings: 2, p. 15
—Chronicles: Books of: 15
—Ezra: Book of, 15
—Nehemiah: Book of, 15
—Psalms: hybrid character of, 67-70;
    creator-god in, 68; 13 (14), 199
—Isaiah: 2: 1, 13: 1, p. 180; 32, referred
    to, 200
—Jeremiah: I: 9-10, p. 49, 12, referred
    to, 180, 5: 12ff., 200
—Amos: 1: 1, p. 180; 7, referred to, 180
—Maccabees, Books of: 15
—Luke: 21: 28, p. 216
—John, Gospel of: and the Word of the
    Beginning, 186; 16: 24, p. 195
—Romans: 1: 18-23, quoted and dis-
    cussed, 177
—Ephesians: 4: 22-24, p. 71
—Colossians: referred to, 71; 2, and
    theotes, 183
—2 Timothy: 3: 17, p. 143
—Hebrews: 11: 1, and formula of faith,
    69
Brahman, 96
Breton, André: Ode à Charles Fourier,
    145
Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, 175
Buddha: 41, 43; in Mani's self-inter-
    pretation, 40; spiritual outburst in,
    78
Buddhism, 46

Caesar: 37; drive for empire, 31-32
Camus, Albert: xvii; break with
    Sartre, 135
Caringella, Paul, xxxiii
Chain: symbolism of and motivation
    for, 94-96, 98
Chain, aetiological: 107; attempt to
    construct by Ionian and Italian phi-
    losophers, 107-109; inadmissable in
    Aristotle, 107-109
Chandra, 96
Chandragupta, 18
China: 46, 58; and historiographic
form, 15-19; existence reordered
through experiences of transcen-
dence, 24, 26-29; cosmological
order disintegrates into power and
spirit, 26; no polytheism of Homeric
type, 28; ritual kingship, 29; and
transfer of authority, 48; and histo-
riogenesis, 56; spiritual outburst in
Confucius, 78
Ch'in dynasty, 17
Chinese kingship: as ritual rule over
    ecumene, 26
Chou dynasty: 16; and transfer of au-
    thority, 48
Chou period, 17
Christ: as theotes in Colossians 2,
    p. 183; in Mani's self-interpretation,
    40; excluded by Jaspers from axial
    time, 42; and formula for transfer of
    authority, 48; epiphany of, 184
Christianity: 41; and historiogenesis,
    56
Chrysippus: and term agnoia ptoiodes
    (scary ignorance), 202
Ch'un-Ch'iu, 16
Cicero: Somnium Scipionis in Mac-
    robius, 76; terms morbus animi and
    aspernatio rationis, 203
Clauberg, Johannes: Metaphysica,
    mentioned, 197
Clement of Alexandria: histo-
    riogenesis in fight against poly-
    theism, 56
Cognitio fidei, 220
Comte, Auguste: xxii, 117, 129,
    144-45, 147, 153, 157-59; Law of
    Three Phases, 76; construction of
    history, 113; "two careers" dis-
    cussed, 139-43; Cours de phi-
    losophie positive,
140; Système de
    politique positive,
140
Comte, Madame, 140
Concrete-abstract events of reflection,
    189-90
Condorcet, Marquis Marie Jean An-
    toine, xvii, 117, 141, 154
Configuration of history: defined and
    discussed, 37, 39-40; determined by
    experiences of transcendence,
    39-40; distribution of spiritual out-
    bursts as problem, 42
Confucianism: 46, attacked by advo-
cates of power politics, 28-29
Confucius: 26, 33, 41, 43; and transfer
    of authority, 48; spiritual outburst
    in, 78
Conscience: existential virtues at root
    of, 90
Consciousness: as clearing in exis-
    tence, 89; as illuminated tension in
    field of non-existence, 89
Constants of history: discussed,
    36-37; and axial time, 47; and his-
    toriogenesis, 56
Contemplation: as philosophic equiva-
    lent of ritual in myth, 90
Correggio, 128
Cosmic: 75, 79, 90; of partners in cos-
    mos, 62; of all being, 73
Cosmogony: classed with histo-
    riogenesis, 53; ritual repetition of,
    62; forming aggregate with the-
    ogony, anthropogony, and histo-
    riogenesis, 72-75; Babylonian and
    Sumerian, 94
Cosmological empires, 17; under-
    standing of history in, 59
Cosmological myth, 74
Cosmological society, 23
Cosmological style of truth: 58,
    74-75; becomes transparent, 61; as
    groping toward truth, 94
Cosmological symbolisms and anal-
    ogy, 62
Cosmology: closing in after flowering
    of Greek science, 93
Cosmos: compact experience of, 3; of
    primary experience, described,
    58-59; full of gods, 84; instantane-
    ous presence of, 170; primary experi-
    ence of, 171-72
Creativity: as divine, 173; of the Be-
    ginning, 224; related to surplus of
    divine reality, 224
Creator-god: in hybrid psalms, 68
Cultural diffusion: discussed, 41-42
Cyclical time: in Aristotelian Prob-
    lemata,
64
Cyrus, 37

D'Alembert, Jean, 154
Dante: symbolism of trasumanar, 227
Darius I, 37, 59
Davidic empire, 17
David Memoir, 15
Delian League, 16
Demythologization: debate about, 158
Descartes, René, xxviini9, xxx, 75,
    154, 192, 197
Deutero-Isaiah: 41, 43, 70; and histori-
    cal symbolism, 14; Israel's exodus
    from itself in, 24
Deuteronomist history, 15
Devas, 96
Diadochic empires: 17; of Seleucids
    and Lagids, 19
Dialectics: Hegelian, 82
Diderot, Denis, 154
Differentiation: language of and crite-
    ria of, 72; of philosophy, 75
Dilthey, Wilhelm: Geisteswissen-
    schaften
and their ambiguous struc-
    ture, 158
Divertissement (diversion): in Pascal,
    opposed to stupor of existence, 82
Doric invasion, 27
Doric iron age, 72
Dream: as stratum of reality, 84
Droysen, J. G., 37
Dumas, Georges, 142

Ea, 95
East, Charles, xxiii
Ecumenic empires, 18, 37
Egypt: 24, 43, 58-59; and historiogra-
    phy, 52; no prophet in Intermediate
    Periods, 61
Egyptian empire: as cosmological, 18;
    and historiogenesis, 56; claim to
    represent order of cosmos, 95
Einstein, Albert, 163
Eliade, Mircea: 158; Mythe de 1'éter-
    nel retour,
quoted, 63
Eliot, T. S.: Waste Land, quoted, 85;
    Waste Land as symbol, 85
Ellegood, Donald, xii, xvi
Empire: as existence in cosmological
    form, 24; and power drive, 31-32; as
    cosmic analogue, 62
Encounter, sphere of: 10, history and
    historiography emerge from, 11,
    13-15
Encounters: diversified fields of, 33
Enlightenment: and acute perversion
    of immanence, 81; revolt against
    fundamentalism of ecclesiastic
    Christianity, 81; Philosophes, 125
Enuma elish, 72, 86
Episteme (knowledge), 102-104, 109
Equivalence: of symbolic forms,
    53-56; in symbolizations, 66; of
    myth and philosophy, 72, 74; of phi-
    losophy and myth in Macrobius,
    75-77; of mytho-speculation and
    philosophy, 77; in styles of truth, 78
Eudaimonia (happiness): in Aristotle,
    91
Euhemerus: "utopia" of, 56
Existence: deformation of, 121; stupor
    of, 81; human, dimensions of, 126;
    luminosity of, 157
Existential assent and rational order of
    society, 133-136
Existential virtues, 90
Experience and transcendence: Apoca-
lypse of Abraham as example of, 4,
5, 6; can disrupt primary experience
of cosmos, 21; constituting God and
man as persons, 21; in Moses,
24-25; as new interpretation of
being, 30; establishes criteria of his-
torical relevance, 35; in conflict
with truth of empire, 58; and new
style of truth, 69-70; and sym-
bolism of chain, 94
Ezekiel: recognizes everyman as moral
    subject, 25

Fabula: uses of term clarified by Mac-
    robius, 75
Faith: in formula of Heb. 11: 1, p. 69;
    and joy of discovery, 70; as search of
    ground, 81; actualization of relation
    to the ground, 92; and double truth,
    92; medieval tension between Faith
    and Reason, 211
Fall of man: Schiller's deformation of,
    123
Feuerbach, Ludwig, 115
Fichte, J. G.: 147; Wissenschaftslehre,
    144
Fides: quaerens intellectum , 191-96;
    traditional, 211; degenerative doc-
    trinism of rejected by Locke, 198;
    cosmological, 216, 222-23; Plato's
    equivalent to Christian, 224
Field of non-existence: 87-90; not yet
    articulated in cosmological so-
    cieties, 92; site of tension toward
    ground, 93; in Upanishadic dialogue,
    96; in Aristotle, 101; explored in
    philosophy, 105
Finality: phantasy of absolute in He-
    gelian systems, 190
First Cause, 109
Flora, Joachim of, 206
Fool: meaning of, 199
Fourier, Charles, 144-45
Frazer, J. G.: Golden Bough, 84
Freising, Otto of, 206
Freud, Sigmund: 117; and enlarging of
    horizon, 84
Fundamentalism: as perversion of phi-
    losophy and theology, 64; Enlighten-
    ment revolt against ecclesiastic
    Christianity, 81; in balancing act of
    Hegel, 82; God as objectified exis-
    tent thing, 82

Gaea, 59
Galilei, xxvii
Gargi Vachaknavi, 95
Gathas, 23
Gaunilo: 192, 197-98, 206; as "fool"
    (insipiens), 199
Gilson, Etienne: xxix, 192, 210; char-
    acterization of Christian metaphys-
    ics, 186; discussion of Thomas'
    language of Being, 209, 212
Gnosticism: 50; ancient and modern,
    51; modern, and cosmos, 66
Gnostic mass movements, 51
Gnostics: turn tension of time and
    eternity into pneumatic drama, 51;
    radically spiritualized divinity, 212
Gnostic sects, 31
Gnostic speculations on history, 39
God: revealed as world-transcendent
    creator, 67; transcendent, 78-79; in
    fundamentalism, 82
Gods: known and unknown in Babylo-
    nian Prayer, 70; being on side of im-
    manence, 77; of polytheism, and
    transcendent God, 78; subsitutes in
    Church, 78; become relay stations,
    79; tradition that celestial bodies are
gods, 106
Gods, intracosmic: as obstacles, 78;
    not expendable, 78; denied as arche
    by Aristotle, 107
Gouhier, Henri, 153
Great Synagogue, 181
Ground: of primary experience, 62;
    found in Revelation, 67
Ground of existence: and no-ground,
    67; lost by perversion of transcen-
    dence, 83; as impenetrable mystery,
    105

Han dynasty, 17
Han Fei, 28
Han period: historians of, 16
Hasmonaean resistance, 17
Hatshepsut, 60
Hegel, G. W. F.: xxiv, xxx, 114,
116-17, 120-21, 129, 134, 139, 141,
144-45, 150, 153-54, 157-58, 161,
192; and reason in history, 72; bal-
ance between fundamentalism and
enlightenment, 82; suspends tension
of immanence-transcendence, 82;
death of God, 85; construction of
history, 113; concept of Geist,
118-119; List der Vernunft com-
pared with Schiller's "destiny, " 125;
Phänomenologie, Wissenschaft der
Logik;
and Philosophie der Ge-
schichte
discussed, 148
Heidegger, Martin, 117
Hellas: 43, 46; and historiographic
    form, 15-19; existence reordered
    through experiences of transcen-
    dence, 24, 26-29; absence of ritual
    kingship, 26; consciousness of
    epoch, 40; and transfer of authority,
    48
Hellenic philosophy: 100-101; as
    style of truth, 67
Hellenism: age of, 37
Henningsen, Manfred, xvi, xxvi-vii
Heraclitus: 28, 41; attack on myth, 28;
    and immanent soul, 80; and "this
    cosmos here, " 96
Herodotus: Historiae, 15-16, 18
Hesiod: 224, 226; hierarchy of being,
    7; criticisms of Hellenic society, 27;
    attack on myth in Theogony, 28;
    and attack on myth, 29; Uranus and
    Gaea, 59; theogony, 72; Titano-
    machia, 72; in Aristotle, 101; The-
    ogony
and relevation, 228
Highest Good, 109
Hillel, 181
Hinduism, 41, 46
Historia profana: in Schiller's con-
    struction, 127
Historia sacra: in Schiller's construc-
    tion, 127
Historiogenesis: symbolic form,
    13-15; proposed as name, 53-58;
    discussed, 53-58; and irreversible
    time, 55; in modern West, 56; as
    great constant, 56, 58; assuages
    anxiety, 62, 8y; rationality in,
    72-75; forming aggregate with the-
    ogony, anthropogony, and cos-
    mogony, 72-75; in Aristotle's
    Metaphysics, 101
Historiogenetic form: in Berossus and
    Manetho, 20
Historiography: as symbolic form,
13-15; in China, 15-16; in Hellas,
15-16; in Israel, 15-16; as response
to event of empire, 16; question of
appearance of, 23; from parallel re-
sponses in several societies, 34;
combined with mythopoesis, 52
History:
as object, 1-3, 7-8; subject
matter of, 9; as drama, 9; double
meaning of, 10; emerges from sphere
of encounter, 11; double constitu-
tion of, 12-13, 34; as univocal and
as meaning endowing, 13; as distur-
bance of order caused by rise of em-
pire, 17; as index, 18, 21, 22, 23, 35;
double constitution of, 35, 38; as re-
alization of eternal being in time,
35, 38; transcendental texture, 35,
38; pseudo-histories, 36; and gnostic
speculations, 39; as drama, 50; uni-
linear, 55-57, 62; not of "ideas" or
"doctrines" in modern sense, 100;
Aristotle, 100-102; in First and Sec-
ond Reality, 144; of deformation,
151
Hobbes, Thomas, 154
Holbach, Paul Henri Dietrich, 78
Hollweck, Thomas, xxxiii
Homer: 26, 36, 80; experience of tran-
    scendence inchoate in, 27; "attack"
    on by Plato, 28; in Aristotle, 101;
    Oceanus and Tethys as parents of
    creation in, 107
Homeric epic: and use of myth, 80
Homo Dei: in 2 Tim. 3: 17, p. 143
Homoiosis theo (likeness to God), 27
Homonoia, 90
Homunculus: 143-44, 146; man and
    his consciousness replaced by imagi-
    nary Self, 136; becomes Second Per-
    son of the Trinity in Hegel's Logic,
    149; his existence opposed to exis-
    tence as man, 156
Hooke, Samuel S., 86-87, 90
Humboldt, Wilhelm von, 145
Husserl, Edmund, xxviin19, 208n2
Hyksos, 60
Hymn to Vac, 180
Hypostatizing constructions: inad-
    missibility of, 179

Identity of man: constituted through
    existence in tension toward the
    ground, 137
Imagination, 51
Imago Dei: as Christian symbol, 80
Immanence: structural tension with
    transendence, 3; and transendence
    as indices, 3, 6, 21; perversion of, 79,
    81-83
Immortality: divine and "intermedi-
    ate, " 224
Immortalizing: as action of noetic phi-
    losophizing, 187
In-Between: of divine-human encoun-
    ter, 190
In-Between reality: development of
    language of, 178
Incarnation, 81
India: 58; and history of, 18; and histor-
    iogenesis, 56
Indian, 46
Indra, 96
Infinite series: as fallacy in Aristotle,
    107
Intellectus: as clearing in existence, 87
Intentionalist reduction, 207
Intentionality: lack of clarity about in
    Anselm's Proslogion, 206; as struc-
    ture of consciousness, 207
Intracosmic gods: not expendable, 78;
    denied as arche by Aristotle, 107
Ionian philosophers: on arche, 52; and
    construction of aetiological chain,
    107; defended by modern philoso-
    phers, 109
Ionians, 101
Iran, 46
Isaiah: 200, 228; mentioned, 32
Islam, 24, 41, 46
Israel: 17, 43, 49-50, 50; and histo-
    riographic form, 15-19; exodus
    from cosmological Egypt, 24; exodus
    from itself into mankind, 24; con-
    sciousness of epoch, 40; and transfer
    of authority, 48; and historiography,
    52; struggle of prophets against de-
    fection, 67
Israelite revelation: as style of truth,
    67

James, Henry, xxiv
James, William, 208 n2
Jaspers, Karl: xvii; axial time, 41, 46;
    excludes Christ and Moses from ax-
    ial time, 42
Jean Paul: 121; Vorschule der Aes-
    thetik
quoted, 120
Jeremiah: 43, 50, 228; and transfer of
    authority, 48; ordained as prophet,
    49
Josephus: 15; Jewish Antiquities, 20
Jovian Dike: civilizational victory of,
    72
Joyce, James, 84
Judaism: and historiogenesis, 56
Jung, Carl: and enlarging of horizon,
    84

Kant, Immanuel: xxivn12, xxv, 117,
    141, 154, 168, 192, 197; language of
    phenomena and noumena, 12
Kierkegaard, Søren, 117, 161
Kinesis (movement or upheaval): in
    Thucydides, 17
King-lists: of Berossus and Manetho,
    20
Kingship: symbolisms of, 62

Lagids, 19
Laing, R. D.: Divided Self, quoted,
    160-61
La Mettrie, Julien Offray de, 78
Language: root in hybridity of experi-
    ence, 70; function in constitution of
    society, 70; discussion of articula-
    tion of experience, 176-78; as real-
    ity emerging as the luminous
    "word" from divine-human encoun-
    ter, 231
Lao-tse: 41; question of dating, 43
Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm: 128, 154,
    192, 197; fundamental questions of
    Principes de la nature et de la grâce,
    74; questions concerning existence
    and essence, 209
Littré, Emile, 140
Locke, John, 128, 154, 192
Lonergan, Bernhard, 158
Löwith, Karl, xvii
Luminosity of existence, 157

Macrobius: terminology of, 75; com-
    mentary on Cicero's Somnium Sci-
    pionis,
75-77
Mahavira, 43
Mahayana Buddhism, 41
Maimonides, xxviiin19
Man: as interpreter of being, 30
Manetho: self-interpretation as
    prophet of fulfillment, 40; uses term
    ecumene, 40; and historiogenesis,
    56
Mann, Thomas, 84
Mannheim, Karl: Der allgemeine Ideo-
    logieverdacht,
135
Manuel, Frank E., 142
Marduk, 86
Margenau, Henry: xxv, 168; Nature of
    Physical Reality,
quoted, 163-64
Maritain, Jacques, xxix
Marx, Karl: 115, 117, 129, 145; con-
    struction of history, 113
Maurya empire, 18
Meditation: actualization of relation
    to the ground, 92; noetic, 104; pneu-
    matic, 104
Memphite Theology, 59
Mesopotamia: 24, 58; and historiogra-
    phy, 52
Mesopotamian empire: as cosmo-
    logical, 18; and historiogenesis, 56;
    claim to represent order of cosmos,
    95
Metalepsis (participation), 110
Metaleptic structure, 190
Metaphysics: term introduced by Saint
    Thomas Aquinas, 197
Metastasis: dissolves tension, 66
Metaxy: 178; of the psyche, 179; not
differentiated in Rig-Vega, 180; and
emergence of the word, 184; psyche
exists in, 184; and language indices
of immanent, transcendent, exter-
nal, internal,
185; noetic quest as
process in, 187; symbols arising
from, 188; reflection on, 189; lumi-
nosity of consciousness, 208; and
the agonic ambiguity of life and
death, 226
Methexis (participation), 6, 21, 90
Mill, John Stuart, 140, 142
Mind of the heart, 5, 99
Minkowski, H., 163
Minoan foundation of civilizational
    order: in Plato, 19
Mitanni, 59
Moods: fluctuation of, 117
Moses: 24, 33, 46, 132, 182, 214; ex-
    cluded from axial time by Jaspers,
    42; Schiller's deformation of his his-
    tory, 123; Schiller's Deistic concep-
    tion of Thornbush Episode, 124; and
    Thornbush Episode, 98, 186
Mycenaean bronze age, 72
Mystery: as area filled by wonders in
    myth, 106; philosopher's discipline,
    106
Mystery of existence: 53, 62-63; as
    object of speculation, 64; lost in He-
    gel's system, 82
Myth: 106; attack on, as theme of
Hellenic spiritual history, 27-28;
truth of and "untruth" of, 28;
people's, 30; attacks on form a se-
ries, 36; symbols of, 50; as medium
for speculation in cosmological so-
cieties, 53; of the cosmos, 57, 62; as
equivalent to philosophy, 72, 74;
cooperation with philosophy in
mytho-speculation, 74; in Mac-
robius, 75-77, types of, 75-79; and
Reason, 75-94, 99-110; as equiva-
lent to immanence transcendence,
77-79; and attack on divine pres-
ence in world, 78; continues in use,
79; as play of divine presence,
79-80; need never atrophy, 80-81;
revival of, 83-84; as stratum of real-
ity, 84; prototype in Babyloinian
New Year festival, 86; conjunction
with ritual, 86-87; articulates field
of non-existence, 90; full sense of in-
cludes ritual, 90; truth of philosophy
superior to, 93; confronts philoso-
phy in Aristotle, 104; and tradition
that celestial bodies are gods, 106;
Platonic, discussed, 213n3, 229;
term used indiscriminately, 228
Myth of cosmos: 57; challenged, 67
Mythopoesis: freedom of in Homeric
epic, 80
Mytho-speculation: paired as forma-
    tive unit, 55; distinguished from
    ordinary of myth, 93; process of con-
    struction in, 94; in Aristotle's noetic
    quest, 107; not simply "myth, " 228

Nakshatras, 96
Natanson, Maurice, xxii, xxxv
Newton, Isaac: xxivn12, 165, Prin-
    cipia,
147
New Year festivals: as rituals to re-
    store order of society, 55; and coro-
    nation ritual, 65; as prototype of
    myth, 86; combine ritual and story,
    95
New Year rituals: to abolish time, 62
Nietzsche, Friedrich: xxivn11, 115,
    117, 121, 161; and murder of God,
    85, 232; quoted, 120
Noesis noeseos (noetic act, acting on
    itself), 110
Noetic encounter: ambiguity of, 217
Non-existence: and anxiety, 62; field
    of, 87-90; noetic dimensions of,
    108-109
Non-existent ground: articulated by
    reason, 90
Non-existent reality: and preservation
    of mystery, 106
Nothing: empty field of, 121
Nous (mind): in Macrobius, 75; sym-
bol of Reason, 80; as clearing in
existence, 87; as life of reason in Ar-
istotle, 90; in Aristotelian homo-
noia,
90; divine knowing recognized
as Prime Mover in Aristotle, 104; for
philosopher not same as intracosmic
gods of myth, 106; as the third god
in Plato's theology, 187

Objectification: extremes of, 2-3
Ontological proof: discussed, 196-203
Ontology: term in Metaphysica, 197;
    discussed, 198
Ousia ontos ousa: 213, translations of
    terms discussed, 214

Pan Piao: produced Han-shu with Pan
    Ku, 16
Parmenides: 28; speculation on Being,
    2; distinguished true Being from
    doxa, 7; attack on myth, 28; vision
    of One Being, 72
Parousia of the Beyond: discussed,
    221-22, 231
Participatio, 90
Participation: as Platonic methexis, 6
Pascal, Blaise: xxivn, 154; and diver-
    tissements,
82
Patriarchal history, 19
Paul, Saint: xxx, 70, 183; in Mani's
    self-interpretation, 40; Colossians
    referred to, 71; old man and new
    man, 139; homo dei in 2 Tim. 3: 17
    opposed to Comtean homo humani-
    tatis,
143; Rom. 1: 18-23, quoted
    and discussed, 177; Colossians 2 and
    the theotes, 183
Periagoge (conversion of the prisoner
    in the Cave), 188
Periodization: of history, 37
Persia: conquest of Babylon, 17
Persian empire, 37
Persian Wars, 16, 26
Pharaoh: 68; as mediator of divine
    presence, 24
Philo, 182
Philodoxos (lover of opinion): in Plato,
    105; equivalent of philosophe, 136
Philodoxy (love of opinion): in Plato,
    30
Philomythos (lover of myth): in Aris-
    totle, 105
Philosopher: represents truth of exis-
    tence, 50; discipline of, 106
Philosophes: 146; Plato's philodoxers,
    136
Philosophy: versus Sophistic thought,
    3; of history, revolutionary action,
    66; does not increase certainty, 69;
    cooperates with myth in mytho-
    speculation, 74; equivalence to
    Myth, 74; as handmaid of theology,
    92; superiority over myth, 93; con-
    fronts myth in Aristotle, 104
Physical reality: experience of, 166
Pindar: as prophetic poet, 145
Pirke Aboth I: quoted, 181
Plato: xxii, xxviiin19, xxx, xxxvi, 14,
21, 27, 29, 33, 36, 176, 187, 198, 202,
204-205, 210, 214, 220-21, 223,
229, 232; and conception of Ideas, 6;
Timaeus, 6; conception of great
cycle of civilizational order, 19; cre-
ates symbol methexis, 21; "attack"
on Homer, attack on Sophists,
28-30; and philodoxy, 30; respect
for people's myth in Epinomis, 30;
opposition to Sophists, 32; time as
eikon of eternity in Timaeus , 39;
and transfer of authority, 48; trans-
formation of historiogenesis, 58; in-
crease of cosmological awareness,
67; and Idea in Macrobius, 77; cau-
tions against depriving people of
myth, 78; cautions against depriving
people of God, 80; Kallipolis, 92;
coins term theology, 99; Symposion,
99; dialogue tradition in Aristotle,
100; Phaedo, 100; dialogic filiation
to Aristotle, 101; Gorgias, 134; de-
veloped language of In-Between real-
ity, 178; anoia equivalent of Isra-
elitic nebala, contempt for God,
200; refutation of Sophistic triads,
201; typoi peri theologias, 203;
myth of the Phaedrus, 212; philoso-
pher's myth as story of divine real-
ity, 212n3; luminosity of self-
reflection in Phaedrus, 215; discus-
sion of the "rise" in Phaedrus, 216;
does not transcend the "cosmos, " or
the "world, " 219; discussion of cre-
ativity of Beginning in Timaeus,
224; Timaeus 90a-b, Gorgias,
quoted 225; philosophy of self-
reflective interaction between
noesis and cosmological vision, 228
Player of the Puppets: Platonic myth,
80, 213n3; cords become prison
bars, 83
Pleonexia (personal power drive), 27,
    32
Plotinus: xxviiin19, 104, 176, 223;
    Emanation in Macrobius, 77
Pneumopathological case: Schiller's
    spiritual alienation, 132
Pneumopathology: in the sciences of
    man in the wake of the Systems,
    157; term coined by Schelling, 202
Poincare, Jules Henri: conception of a
    limited universe, 167-68
Polytheism: Homeric type never de-
    veloped in China, 28
Polytheistic myth: in Hellas, 27
Pompey: capture of Jerusalem, 15
Positivism: perversion of immanence,
    88
Pragmatic history, 31
Prajapati, 96
Primary experience of cosmos: 58, 59,
62, 64, 67; and experiences of tran-
scendence, 21, 22-23; as back-
ground to Homeric society of gods
and men, 27; emancipation of so-
phists and philosophers from,
29-30; and totality of being, 30; de-
fective forms of, 30; by experiences
of transcendence, 35; break from,
43; in contemporary Western so-
cieties, 56; dominates cosmological
society, 57; challenged, 62; tension
of cosmic existence remains, 66;
core does not disappear in differ-
entiation, 70; truth of obscured by
spiritual outburst, 78; and experi-
ence of transcendence on point of
emergence, 96
Prime Mover: in Aristotle, 104, 106
Proof: and noetic quest, 206
Prophet: as representative and medi-
    ator, 50
Prophetes: definition of, 145
Protagoras, 1
Prote Philosophia (First Philosophy),
    99, 107
Proton aition (ultimate ground), 99
Psyche (soul): 5; site of divine-human
    mutual participation, 178; as meta-
    leptic, 185
Puranas: historical responses of, 14
Pyramid Texts, 25
Pythagoras, 41, 225

Quetelet, Adolphe, 147

Raphael, 128
Ratio: as understood in the symbols of
    Faith, 205
Ratio eterna, 90
Re, 60, 68
Reality: as divine, 17; and Myth,
75-94, 99-100; as clearing in exis-
tence, 87-89, 99; Age of, 92; mul-
tiple meanings of, 113; as act of
divine mythopoesis, 185
Reason: as realm of philosopher, 50; in
the search of order, 72; in history for
Hegel, 72; at core of myth and phi-
losophy, 74-75; meanings of, 88; ac-
quires truth by act of meditative
articulation, 90; as ordering force of
existence, 90; and styles of truth,
92; as core of pressure in movement
from compactness, 93; recognized in
Aristotle as constituent of history, 101;
opposed to un-reason, 131; rela-
tion to existence, 133; use of term,
135; so-called Age of Reason, 136;
noetic and doxic, 136; medieval ten-
sion between Reason and Faith, 211
Recta ratio, 133
Reflection: form of dealing with fun-
    damental problems of truth and lan-
    guage, 188; as part of a process that
    internally has cognitive structure,
    189
Representative humanity, 47, 49
Res sacrae: in Macrobius, 75, 77
Revelation: symbols of, 50; as spiritual
    revolution, 67; does not increase
    certainty, 69
Revolt, 81
Rig-Veda, 180
Ritual: in New Year festival, 86-87;
    and myth, 86-87, 90-91; philo-
    sophic equivalent in philosophy in
    contemplation, 90
Ritual ecumene: in China, 28
Ritual kingship: absent in Hellas, 26;
    in China, 26, 29
Rituals: and "whole" of cosmos, 65
Roman empire, 32
Rome: 58; expansion of, 17; imperial
    expansion, 31; imperial period as
    epoch, 37; and historiogenesis, 56
Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, 145
Rowland, Benjamin: Art and Architec-
    ture of India,
quoted, 86

Saint-Simon, Claude Henri de, 145,
    147
Sandoz, Ellis, xi
Sartre, Jean Paul: xxiv, 111, 117, 135,
    139, 161; analysis of deficient exis-
    tence in L'être et le neant, dis-
    cussed, 111; moi, 116; moi
    compared to Hegel's Thought,
    118-19
Saul, 17
Schelling, F. W J.: xxivn11; Philosophy
    of Myth, 76; coined term pneu-
    mopathology,
202
Schiller, Friedrich, xxiv, 145; lectures
    of, analyzed, 122-39
Schütz, Alfred, xxii, xxxv
Scientism, 66
Search: as site of meeting of man and
    Beyond, 5
Sebba, Gregor, xxivn12
Second Realities: imagination of as an
    anodyne for anxiety and alienation,
    130; projectors of as social forces,
    134
Second Reality: 127, 129, 133, 147;
    analyzed, in; projected in Schiller's
    lectures, 122; eclipse of true self by,
    142; "bad faith" and "good faith" as
    indices of, 162
Sedlmayer, Hans, xxviii
Seleucid empire, 17
Seleucids, 19
Self: 137; shrunken or contracted,
    111-21 passim; imaginary Self re-
    places consciousness, 136; true and
    false, 138
Self-salvation: of Comte, Hegel, and
    Nietzsche, 161
Shakespeare, William: Richard II (Act V, Scene 5),
    quoted, 65
Shamash, 95
Shammai, 181
Shang Yang, 28
Shu-ching: historical responses of, 14
Socrates: 29, 32, 101; and transfer of
    authority, 48; in Phaedo, 100
Solonic reform, 27
Sophia (Wisdom), 99, 104
Sophistic paradoxes, 2
Sophistic triads of propositions: 1, 7,
    50; genesis in wake of Parmenides,
    2-3; with modern propositions, 3;
    in context of Plato's type of theol-
    ogy, 22; quoted, 200
Sophists: 1, 29; versus philosophers,
    48; defended by modern philoso-
    phers, 109
Sorokin, Pitrim: Fads and Foibles in
    Modern Sociology and Related Sci-
    ences,
quoted, 159
Soul: theomorphism, 22; no word in
    Homer for, 80; theomorphic, 80
Space-time, 164
Spartan League, 16
Spengler, Oswald, xvii
Speusippos, 100
Spinoza, Benedict de, 192
Spiritual outburst: and primary experi-
    ence of cosmos, 78; in Buddha and
    Confucius, 78; and continuation of
    intracosmic myth, 79; noetic, 93
Ssu-ma Chien: 17; produces Shih-chi
    with Ssu-ma T'an, 16
Stirner, Max: 117; exposure of con-
    tracted self in Der Einzige und sein
    Eigentum,
115; Ich, 116
Stormgod, 59
Stupor, 156
Stupor of existence: 81; and diver-
    sions, 82
Style of truth: disintegration of, 62;
    stratification in, 62; cosmological,
    74-75; superiority and inferiority,
    75; of philosophic over cosmological
    questioned, 90; not an object in ex-
    ternal world, 92
Styles of truth: as complexes, 57-58;
    equivalences, 66; not abrupt, 67; and
    equivalences, 78; identified by name
    in Aristotle, 104
Subject-object relation, 11
Sumerian King List, 59
Suppiluliumas, 59
Symbols: rational structure of, 189
System: Hegel's construction of, 82; as
    assuaging device, 83; as fundamen-
    talist truth, 83; as perversion of
    transcendence, 83; as prison, 83; as
    Enlightenment conception, 154; as a
    projection of Second Reality, 156-57
Système de politique positive: dis-
    cussed, 140
Systems: effects of, discussed, 152

Tao Te Ching, 43
Teleological argument: 107
Tension: of immanence-transcen-
dence, 3; of the search, 5; of time
and eternity turned into pneumatic
drama by gnostics, 51; constant be-
tween things and ground, 65, 72; in
being, 66; of cosmic existence, 66; at
heart of primary experience, 67; be-
tween man and ground, 72; as stupor
of existence, 81; suspended by He-
gel, 82; poles of, 89; erotic, in Plato's Symposion, 99
Tension of existence: and certainty,
    69-70; Logos of, 87; and reason, 87;
    and assuaging of anxiety, 87; im-
    parted by non-cognitive awareness
    of existence out of nothing, 89;
    poles of, 93; in Upanishadic dia-
    logue, 96; in Aristotle as present of
    search expanded to past, 101
Thales, 59, 100, 107, 209-10
Theogony: in Hesiod, 72; forming ag-
    gregate with cosmogony, anthro-
    pogony, and historiogenesis, 72-75
Theology: term coined by Plato, 22; of
    soul, leads to discovery of history,
    22; philosophy as handmaid of, 92;
    term used by Aristotle as name for
    philosophizing on the ultimate
    ground, 99, 107; philosophy and
    myth claim title of, 106
Theology of Memphis, 186
Theomorphic: soul, 80; nature of the
    psyche, 226
Theomorphism: not part of Chinese
    experience of transcendence, 28
Theoretike energeia (contemplative
    action): in Aristotle, 91
Thornbush Episode: 98, 186; Schiller's
    deistic deformation of, 124
Three Royal Dynasties: 17; conception
    in China of rule by divine decree, 19
Thucydides: Syngraphe ( History of the
    Peloponnesian War
) 15-16
Tiamat, 86
Time: as infinite in Aristotle, 64
Titanomachia: in Hesiod, 72
Toynbee, Arnold, xvi-viii, 26, 41-42,
    46
Transcendence: act of, 5; symbols of,
distinguished from cosmological
symbolism, 22; as outburst after pe-
riod of ferment, 33; perverted in sys-
tems and by fundamentalism, 83; as
directional character of conscious-
ness, 89; misuse of modern term,
217-18; tendency to separate the
participle transcendent [from act of transcendence], 218; act of an intracosmic fides quaerens intellectum, 220
Transcendent style of truth: epic
    comes close to, 80
Transfer of authority, 48
Truth: struggle with Lie, 59; language
    of and the penchant to hypostatize,
    184
Truth of cosmos: and spiritual out-
    bursts, 67
Turgot, Anne Robert Jacques, 117, 141
Tusratta, 59

Unilinear history: Israelite view of, 19
Unilinearity: in Aristotle's Metaphys-
    ics,
101
Universality: illusory in desire for ec-
    umenic empire, 31-32
Universe: defined, 169
Unseen measure: in Solon, 27
Upanishads: quotation from, 95-96
Uranus, 59

Values: misused, 9
Via negativa: 5; in Apocalypse of
    Abraham, 98
Vision: in Plato's Phaedrus, 215;
    imaginative, 227; technical terms of
    in Plato's Timaeus and Republic
    analyzed, 229-31
Voegelin, Mrs. Eric, xxxiii
Voltaire: and compromise of deism, 78

Wade, Francis, xxix
Wagner, Fritz, xxv
Waste Land: as symbol, 85, 87
Whitrow, G. J., xxvi
Within-Beyond: as general structure of
    Being expressed by Platonic me-
    thexis,
6; divine being in soul, 21;
    tension of, and imperial expansion,
    31; tension culminating in epochal
    outbursts, 35; as experience of tran-
    scendence, 49
Wolff, Christian, 197
Wu-ti, 16

Xenophanes, 28, 211

Yahweh: 212; recognized as God of Fa-
    thers, 24; touches Jeremiah, 49;
    speaks from Sinai, 59; in hybrid
    Psalms, 68-70; and transcendent
    God, 70
Yajnavalkya, 95
Yeats, William Butler, 84

Zaehner, R. C, 43
Zetesis: 104, as Platonic seeking of
    ground, 90
Zoroaster: and Zoroastrianism, 23-24;
    question of dating, 43

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