CUMULATIVE INDEX

HISTORY OF POLITICAL IDEAS (VOLS 19-26)

Roman numerals preceding page numbers refer to the eight volumes in History of Political Ideas

Historia communis (universal history),
    V: 223n66, 224
Historiae Adversum Paganos (Orosius),
    I: 220, 222, 223
Historiae Florentinae (Bruni), IV: 41
Historiae Philippicae (Trogus), I: 221
Historia gestorum generalis concilii
   Basiliensis
(John ofSegovia), III: 252n
Historia Mongolorum (Carpini), IV: 44
Historia propria (individual history),
    V: 223n66
Historia universa (universal history),
    V: 223n66
Historical cycles. See Cycles
Historical interpretation: basis of, I: 29;
    "self-expressive phenomena" as
   basis of, I: 52
Historicism: and Buffon's thought,
    VII: 172; and fatalism, VII: 167
Historicity: of Christianity, IV: 223-
    28, 285-91; definition of, VI: 1;
    "historicity of truth," VII: 8-9, 21-
    33; of the mind, VI: 127-29; Vico on,
    VI: 20, 145
Histories (Polybius), I: 122
Historiogenesis, VI: 1
Historiography: Bodin on, V: 182;
    Christian historiography, IV: 42,
    50n18, 51; definition of, I: 29;
    VII: 31; and fame, IV: 46-48; and
    German methodologists, VIII: 121;
    humanistic, IV: 5,41-42, 46-48;
    Poggio Bracciolini onmilitary action
    versus cultivation ofletters, IV: 46;
    and Polybius, I: 124-25; of Turgot,
    VIII: 106-48; of Western political
    ideas, IV: 42-43
History: ages of, I: 210-13, 214;
   and anamnesis, VII: 212-13; and
   anthropology, V: 219-23; Augustine
   on, I: 210-12, 214,220; II: 96, 97,
   127, 128, 130; VI: 116-26; VIII: . 122;
   Babylonian-Hellenicidea of eternal
   recurrence of worldyears, II: 194;
   Bodin on, V: 192-96,219-36, 234-
   35n75; Cardinal Humbert on,
    II: 92-93;Christian view of, IV: 41-
   42, 85, 141; V: 136, 233; VII: 245;
    VIII: 29-30, 29-30n34; Comte's law
   of three phases of history, VIII: 7,
   11, 104, 107, 108-9, 136-37, 175,
   244-50; and construction of epochs,
    I: 210; as "course," II: 14-16; critical
   history, III: 110; cycles of, I: 125-26;
   Daniel and Polybius on idea of world
   history, I: 121-22, 124-25, 150, 168;
   definition of, V: 220; difficulties in
   writing history of political ideas,
    I: 226-37; and disintegration from
   Middle Ages to Renaissance and
   Reformation, I: 30-40; Dunning on
   political history, VI: 4-5; and era
   of Christ, I: 31-32; esprit humain
   as object of, VI: 40-42, 44, 67; and
   evocative process, I: 235; exploration
   of, in partnership with God, I: 42,
   44, 47; as form of consciousness
   reality, I: 43; "general history,"
    VI: 2-3, 4; gentilician history, VI: 20,
   115-16, 119, 128-29, 133, 135, 145;
   Greek theory of, I: 235-36; Hegel
   on, I: 234; VII: 266; VIII: 123; Herder
   on, VII: 212; Herodotean history,
    I: 124; historicity of mind, VI: 127-29;
   as history of participation, I: 42;
   Hölderlin on, VII: 247-48; of ideas,
    IV: 2-3; individual and universal
   history, V: 223-26; intramundane
   history and sacred history, V: 136;
    VI: 42-44, 45; Joachim of Fiore
   on, II: 126-31; III: 241; Kant on,
    II: 130; Le Roy on, V: 146-47; loss
   of Christian meaning of, VIII: 112-
   13; Machiavelli on, IV: 60-71, 61n,
   76; Manichaean interpretation of,
    IV: 165; Marx on, I: 29, 234; IV: 201;
    VII: 7; VIII: 353-56; Nicholas of
   Cusa on, III: 266; Nietzsche's three
   stages of, VII: 302-3; and nonpolitical
   ideas, VI: 6-7; Orosius on, I: 220-23;
   paradigmatic importance of, IV: 61-
   63; "parallel histories," VI: 3n, 7;
   Paul on, I: 168-70, 181, 210; II: 98;
   periodization of, I: 122, 221-22; as
   period of trial culminating in glory
   of real history, I: 115; philosophy
   of, II: 213-14; political history and
    nonpolitical ideas, VI: 6-7; profane
    versus sacred history, VIII: 112-
    13, 119-22; questions concerning
    political history, VI: 5-6; reading of,
    V: 225; reconstruction of historical
    meaning, VI: 40-44; relationship
    of political history and political
    ideas, VI: 3-6; Renaissance pattern
    of, I: 101; rhythms of, V: 137, 146-
    47, 149, 153-54; Roman model of,
    IV: 41-42; Schelling on, VII: 210-
    14; secularized history, VI: 36-37,
    40-42, 44-48, 108; spatial order of,
    V: 226-31; straight-line pattern of,
    I: 222-23; VI: 3; as symbolic form,
    I: 53; and symbols, I: 41, 42, 209-13,
    228; task of philosopher of, VI: 20;
    temporal order of, V: 231-36; Thomas
    Aquinas on, II: 207-15; three ages
    of history in York Tracts, II: 97-98,
    109; Thucydidean history, I: 124;
    transfer of Vico's model of nature
    to, VI: 108-9, 126-27; Trinitarian
    speculation on, III: 14; Turgot's
    categories of, VIII: 122-29; Turgot's
    historicism, VIII: 106-48; universal
    history, IV: 50n18; V: 223-26; VI: 35-
    36, 38-40, 43, 71; Vico on meaning of,
    VI: 131-32; Vico on recursus, VI: 114-
    25; Vico's "psychologization" of,
    VI: 129; Vico's science of, VI: 109-11,
    126-27; Vico's unfolding of mind
    in, VI: 87; Voegelin on nature and
    understanding of generally, I: 29-30;
    Voegelin on order of, IV: 3; Voegelin's
    call for new Christian philosophy
    of, VIII: 29-30, 29-30n34; Voegelin's
    definition of, VII: 31; Voltaire's
    secularization of, IV: 42; Voltaire
    versus Bossuet on, VI: 7-9; writing
    of, V: 224-25. See also New Science
History-of-ideas approach to political
    theory, III: 2, 3
History of Political Ideas (Voegelin):
    abandonment/transformation of,
    by Voegelin, I: 13-14, 16-30, 40-
    41, 50-51; central problem in,
    VIII: 4; chronological periods of,
    V: 1; "complexes of knowledge"
    in, VI: 6; contract with Macmillan
    for publication of, I: 5-11; contract
    with McGraw-Hill for publication of
    textbook, I: 3-5, 49; correspondence
    between Voegelin and his friends
    and colleagues on, I: 14-15, 26-
    27; decision to publish as part of
    Voegelin's Collected Works, I: 1;
    editorial changes in, I: 56-57; IV: 20-
    21; VII: 34-35; editor's preparation of
    manuscript for publication, III: 25-
    26; first draft of, VII: 11-12; genesis
    and development of, I: 2-15, 49-51;
    gloom and near despair underlying,
    I: 45; and "historicity of truth,"
    VII: 21-33; idiosyncratic approach
    of, VIII: 1-3; introduction to, in
    earliest known form, I: 15-18, 21,
    51, 225-37; "leapfrogging" in, I: 53-
    54; length and volumes of, I: 9, 50;
    VII: 2; meaning of modernity in,
    VII: 34; "methodological" questions
    in, VI: 1-2, 2n4; misimpressions of,
    III: 3; new titles for, I: 8-9; VII: 2-3;
    outline of cumulative contents of,
    I: 239-65; and paradigm of "political
    idea," VII: 9-20, 29; publishing
    arrangement for, VII: 1; purpose of,
    I: 10; III: 1; VII: 9; reconstruction
    of original manuscript, I: 15-16;
    rejections of, by Macmillan, I: 11, 13-
    14; relationship of, with Voegelin's
    later writings, I: 1-2, 8, 42-47, 50,
    51; reviewers' comments on, I: 6-8,
    52n6; VII: 2, 11, 12; Sabine's textbook
    as competitor of, VI: 5; significance
    of, I: 55-56; III: 3-5; IV: 17; submitted
    to Macmillan Trade Department,
    I: 11, 11n15; submitted to Oxford
    University Press, I: 12; themes and
    approaches in, generally, I: 51-56;
    and theory of evocations, VII: 10-
    11, 16-18, 21-22, 33; underlying
    conception of, VIII: 5, 17-18;
    Voegelin's changes in manuscript
    of, VII: 1-9; Voegelin's decision
    not to publish, III: 3, 4; Voegelin's
    difficulties in conceptualization
    of, VII: 3-5, 21-22; Voegelin's
    introduction to, V: 7; Voegelin's
    process of writing and ideas in, I: 2,
    3-4; II: 14; IV: 1-3, 17n; Voegelin's
    view of, as flawed, III: 1-2, 3
History of Political Theory (Sabine),
    VII: 9
History of the Goths (Cassiodorus),
    II: 43
History of the Goths (Jordanes), II: 43-
    44
History of the Lombards (Paul the
    Deacon), II: 47
History of the Visigoths (Isidore),
    II: 44n6
History of the World to the Year
    of Human Salvation
(Sabellicus),
    VI: 36n
Hitler, Adolf: catastrophes ensuing
    from, IV: 180, 246; compared with
    Comte, VIII: 185; and concentration
    camps, IV: 180; as fulfillment of
    Veltro prediction, III: 80-81n8;
    heroization of, VII: 231; imperialism
    of, VI: 150; influences on, V: 62;
    and links with the past, IV: 202;
    VII: 124; VIII: 132; from lower
    middle class, IV: 150; personality
    of, compared with Luther, IV: 268;
    and revolution, VII: 26, 155; and
    short-circuit evocation of elites,
    VIII: 132; socialist eschatology of,
    I: 38; IV: 178; VII: 7; and "Victory of
    Faith," VIII: 271
Hitler Youth, IV: 169
Hiung-nu empire, IV: 43
Hobbes, Thomas: attacks on, VII: 61,
    126; Bodin's influence on, V: 180;
    on commonwealth, VII: 67-72; on
    community, VII: 65; compared with
    Locke, VII: 141, 156; compared with
    Machiavelli and Bodin, VII: 59
    61; compared with Retz, VII: 118;
    compared with Spinoza, VII: 130-31;
    compared with Vico, VI: 95, 95n7;
    contract theories of, I: no-ii; and
    control of opinion, VII: 70; and
    cosmology, V: 237; on disoriented
    humans, VI: 112; on fear of death,
    VII: 64-66, 131; and flight from
    summum malum of death in civil
    war, VIII: 82; on fruitio hominis,
    VII: 63-64; on God, VII: 63, 147;
    and history of political theory,
    I: 234; III: 13; on human nature,
    VII: 62-64, 141, 146, 286; on human
    pride, IV: 123, 125, 175; on kingship,
    I: 111, 228; II: 49; Leviathan of,
    IV: 125; V: 98, 160, 206-7; VIII: 44,
    82; and loss of fruitio Dei, VII: 63;
    on madness, VII: 64, 64n8, 70,
    71, 131, 154; and materialistic
    metaphysics, III: 71; V: 184; More
    on, VI: 191-92; on natural law,
    VII: 66-67; on obedience, II: 155; on
    passion, VIII: 67; on peace, VII: 63,
    66; on perfection of legal closure of
    state, VII: 68-69; on perfection of
    spiritual closure of state, VII: 69-
    70; on person, VII: 67-68, 146; as
    philosopher, V: 18; on political order,
    IV: 205; on power, I: 121n5; VII: 63-64,
   119-20, 131, 154, 273n55; on pride,
    I: 121n5; VII: 62-64, 70, 273n55; and
    problem of realism, VII: 59-61; as
    psychological realist, VII: 23, 25,
    59-62, 154; and psychology, I: 80,
    228; V: 38; on reason, VII: 62, 65, 131;
    and "rediscovery of man," VII: 23,
    51; and resolutive-compositive
    method, VII: 50; significance of,
    VII: 73; Skinner on, III: 158n29;
    on spirit and politics, I: 34; III: 69;
    V: 23; summary on, VII: 7I-72; and
    Voegelin's definition of problem of
    the age, VII: 2
--Work: Leviathan, II: 100; III: 53, 158;
    VII: 23-24, 62-72, 273n55
Hodges, Richard, II: 3, 35n2
Hohenstaufen, II: 7n17, 145-47, 158,
    177; III: 39, 104, 163, 193, 197-99,
    203, 207; IV: 102n22
Hohe Obrigkeit (superior authority),
    V: 26
Holbach, Paul-Henri-Dietrich, VI: 8,
    57, 71
Hölderlin, Friedrich, I: 20-21; III: 74;
    VII: 243-50
Holland, I: 114; III: 217, 218, 223;
    IV: 139. See also Netherlands
Holland, Earl of, VII: 109
Hollweck, Thomas, VII: 10, 12
Holy Alliance, VIII: 9, 224-28
Holy empire ( sacrum imperium ):
    and church, II: 84; compared with
    secular concept of imperium, III: 207;
    Dante on, III: 10, 79; disruption and
    disintegration of, I: 33, 215n; II: 68,
    101, 105, 143, 148, 152, 156, 203, 212,
    227; III: 147 125-26, 255, 266; and
    Dominicans and Franciscans, II: 80;
    and Dubois on league of nations,
    III: 10n8; as focal evocation of
    political ideas of Middle Ages, I: 186;
    II: 9, 29-30, 37-38, 65-68; III: 5-8, 15-
    16, 193; VII: 59; Gelasian problems
    of, III: 74; and imperial power,
    III: 40-41; and independent national
    principalities, II: 91; Innocent III's
    reinterpretation of, II: 176; and
    integration of persona regalis into
    mystical body, II: 63; and Investiture
    Struggle, III: 66; as kingdom of God,
    I: 31-32, 169; Lupold of Babenberg on,
    III: 214; national cosmion replacing,
    VII: I70; and Nicholas of Cusa, III: 25;
    and order of powers within, II: 91;
    preparatory phase for, II: 10-12, 30;
    Rienzo on, III: 236; rising strength of
    spiritual pole in, II: 90; Roman empire
    as, I: 223; II: 7n17, 9, 10-12, 29-30,
    37-38, 108; III: 205; terminology
    pertaining to, II: 7n17; theory of,
    I: 38; II: 108-9; III: 46, 193; Thomas
    Aquinas on, II: 108; and William of
    Ockham, III: 123, 125-26
Holy Spirit: in Acts, VII: 98; in
    Amaurian doctrine, IV: 164; Calvin
    on, IV: 281; Cardinal Humbert on,
    II: 92, 93; in Christian life, II: 110;
    descent of, I: 30-32. 165-66; and legal
    rulings, III: 264-65; and Montanism,
    I: 181-82; Paul on, I: 167; and Piers
    Plowman,
III: 182; and Pope Clement
    VI, III: 235-37; Protestant view of,
    IV: 274; Rienzo on, III: 240-41, 241n,
    243
Homer and Homeric myth, I: 10, 143,
    145; II: 41, 42; IV: 55; VI: 86
Homines intelligentiae, IV: 180
Homines religios, VII: 276
Homme sensible (sensible human),
    VIII: 55
Homo christianus, II: 220, 221, 226
Homo faber, VIII: 114
Homo natura, VII: 177, 279, 289
Homonoia, I: 93-94, 98, 197; IV: 222;
    VI: 163; VIII: 115
Homo Novus (New Man), IV: 191
Homo politicus, VIII: 82
Homo spirituals, I: 38-39; IV: 206-8,
    210, 235, 247
Honestas, VI: 112
Honorius, Emperor, II: 56
Honorius III, Pope, II: 146
Honorius of Autun, II: 127-28
Hooker, Richard: on Calvin, V: 92-
    93; on Christian commonwealth,
    IV: 233; V: 80-88; on common enemy,
    V: 17; compared with Luther, V: 88;
    concluding comments on, V: 105-7;
    consent theory of, V: 101, 103, 105;
    "essentials" of religion in, V: 239;
    on minimum dogma, VII: 134; on
    musical harmony, V: 106-7; on
    philosophy of law, V: 98-107; on
    Puritans, V: 92-99, 106-7; royal
    government doctrine of, V: 104
--Work: Ecclesiastical Polity, V: 80-88,
    80n4, 92, 94-95, 101, 103; VII: 140
Hooker, Thomas, VII: . 87
Hope, Machiavelli on, IV: 6, 80-81, 85
Horace, II: 114
Horos, IV: 186
Hospitalers, II: 73
Hotham, Sir John, VII: 109
Hotman, Francois, V: 40, 53; 247n102
Huber, Ernst Rudolf, VII: 297n126
Hugh, Abbot, II: 69
Hugh Capet, II: 48
Hugh of Saint Victor, III: 47-48, 47-
    48nn, 52-53
Hugo, II: 172
Huguenot wars, VII: 105
Humana beatitudo, VI: 111
Human age, VI: 137, 139-40
Human, All-Too-Human (Nietzsche),
    VII: 262-66
Humana natura, III: 182, 183
Humanism: Burdach on, IV: 204,
    205n46; Cusa on, III: 257; of
    Erasmus's Christianity, IV: 92-
    97; and fame, IV: 46-49, 47n13;
    and historiography, IV: 5, 41-42,
    46-48; La Boétie on, V: 28, 34; in
    Renaissance, V: 135-36
Humanitarianism, VI: 54, 75
Human law, II: 224, 225, 227-28
Human nature: Aristotle on, II: 219-20;
    Augustine on, II: 114-15; Buffon
    on, VII: 171-72; Christian idea
    of, VIII: 113-15; "common man,"
    II: 192-93, 208-9; "concrete man,"
    VIII: 113-14; Condorcet on creation
    of superman, VIII: 158-59; corruption
    of, V: 102; d'Alembert on, VIII: 114;
    and desires, IV: 64-65; and "essence
    of man," VII: 55; and Fall of Man,
    I: 202-3; III: 53; IV: 160-62, 196;
    VIII: 279; finiteness of humans,
    VII: 183; and God as proprietor,
    VII: 145-47, 146-47n5, 147n5;
    Grotius on, VII: 55, 57-58, 62, 154;
    Helvétius on, V: 39; VIII: 47-49,
    51-63; Hobbes on, VII: 62-64, 67-68,
    141, 146, 286; human as proprietor
    of self, VII: 147-48; humans as
    collective unit, II: 191-93, 194;
    Hume on, VII: 15 7-62; imperfection
    of humans, I: 170-71, 198-99, 208-9,
    213; IV: 79-81; inequality of humans,
    VIII: 127-29, 155-57; intramundane
    meaning of life, IV: 47-48, 4?n13;
    John of Salisbury's characterology,
    II: 114-17, 116; Kant on, IV: 256;
    Locke on, V: 39; VII: 140-41, 145-
    48, 154; VIII: 47-48, 49; Marx on
    "socialistic man," VIII: 356-59, 370-
    71; Montesquieu on, VII: 163-64;
    normal type of human, V: 201, 202;
    Pascal on, VII: 272, 281-83; VIII: 63-
    69; Protos Anthropos (Primal Man),
    IV: 186, 187, 191, 199, 2I0; V: 222;
    Schelling on, VII: 220-22, 223;
    Spinoza on, VII: 127-31; Thomas
    Aquinas on, II: 219-20; Turgot on,
    VIII: 113-19, 127-30; Vauvenargues
    on, VIII: 49-51
Human sacrifices, V: 127
Human types: in astrology, V: 152n39;
    of Bodin, V: 201-2, 227-31, 241-42;
    of Plato, III: 261; V: 228, 241; of
    Ptolemy, V: 227, 241
Humbert, Cardinal, III: 105
Humbert of Silva Candida, II: 11-12,
    91-94, 95, 96, 97, 141
Humboldt, Wilhelm von, VI: 150
Hume, David: attack on Myth of
    Reason by, VII: 25; compared with
    Locke, VII: 161-62; compared with
    Montesquieu, VII: 162-63, 162n2;
    compared with Vico, VII: 162;
    conservatism of, VII: 158; on contract
    theory, VII: 158, 159; on conventions,
    VII: 161; as epistemologist, VII: 158;
    Harrington's influence on, VII: 103;
    influence of, VI: 150; on nature,
    VII: 159-60; on philosophy versus
    religion, VII: 160, 161; on reason,
    VII: 158-59; and "rediscovery of
    man," VII: 23, 51; skepticism of,
    VII: 157-62; on sympathy, VII: 161,
    163; and theory of sentiments,
    VII: 158-59
--Work: Treatise of Human Nature,
    VII: 157, 159-60
Humiliati, II: 78
Humility, Pascal on, VIII: 65-66
Hundred Years War, III: 40, 62, 128,
    141, 210; IV: 35
Hungary, III: 200; IV: 43; V: 143;
    VIII: 228
Hunnish empire, II: 31
Huns, II: 31, 32, 33, 41, 43, 44n6, 45,
    48; V: 143
Hus, Jan, III: 172-75; IV: 150, 242
Husserl, Edmund, VII: 29
Hussites, III: 41-42, 173-75, 251;
    IV: 137, 139, 148, 222; V: 109
Hussite Wars, IV: 220
Huxley, Aldous, IV: 113; Vl I: 191
Huxley, Thomas, VIII: 193
Hygiène cérébral VIII: 176
Hylici, IV: 182
Hylozoism, VII: 201, 201n3, 202, 202n5
Hyperions Schicksalslied (Hölderlin),
    VII: 244
Hypotheses non fingo, VI: 181, 194,
    210-11

Iacchos, VII: 228
Iamblichus, I
Ibn Bajja, Abu Bakr, II: 186
Ibn Ezra, VII: 127
Ibn Hanbal, Ahmad, II: 186
Iconoclastic movement, IV: 158
Idealism, IV: 48; VII: 201, 202
Ideal plebeian, I: 114
Ideals, III: 70
Ideas: definition of, II: 5; dialectics of,
    I: 21; distinguished from evocations,
    II: 5; "gap" or "interval" in, II: 65-66;
    hieroglyphic use of, I: 52, 128-
    30; origin of, in Stoic "common
    notions," I: 52; and Stoic notion of
    koinai ennoiai, I: 26; tension between
    idea and reality, II: 66-67; Voegelin
    on history of, I: 42; III: 1-4; IV: 2-3;
    Voegelin's giving up on, as objects
    of history, I: 16-17, 22, 23-24, 25,
    40-41, 50. See also Political ideas
Idea veri, VI: 110
Idée directrice, II: 50-51
Ideology, I: 231; VII: 189; VIII: 337-39,
    354
Idiota (layman), II: 139-40, 209; III: 179
Idolatry, V: 51, 214, 216
Idophobia, VIII: 324-27, 324n15, 326-
    27n18, 343
Ignatius of Loyola, V: 60, 61, 62
Ikhnaton, I: 70, 104; IV: 134; V: 244
Ilium, I: 146
Illyrium and Illyrians, I: 186, 193-94;
    II: 54
Images de Dieu (images of God), V: 148
Imago Dei, IV: 202, 210; V: 193, 199
Imitatio Christi, III: 177
Imitatio Dei, V: 200; VI: 101
Immaculate Conception, III: 111
Immanence, II: 9, 16, 17, 136
Immanentism, I: 37; II: 10, 12-14,
    194; V: 2, 140; VII: 33, 257-60, 269,
    280-81, 289, 291, 294-97
Immanentization, II: 16-17
Immortalitas, IV: 47n13
Immutator (destroyer), I: 223
Impeachment of 1642 (England), VII: y8
Imperator, I: 189; III: 206, 207, 216
Imperatorem promovendus, III: 206
Imperator futurus, III: 206, 208
Imperator in regno suo, II: 152; III: 216;
    V: 74, 75; VI: 72
Imperator vel rex Romanorum, III: 206
Imperatura, III: 207
Imperaturam Romani solii, III: 207
Imperfection of humans, I: 170-71,
    198-99, 208-9, 213; IV: 79-81
Imperialism: British, I: 124; and
    civilizational superiority, V: 127-
    28; later developments on, V: 131-33;
    More on, IV: 9, 127-28, 130; and
    natural law of human intercourse,
    V: 124-25; pan-Slavic, VIII: 272-75;
    and propagation of Christianity,
    V: 12 5-27; Vitoria on, V: 121-28
Imperial policy and power. See
    Emperors; Empires; Realm; and
    specific empires
Imperium (dominion): Apollonian,
    IV: 201-14; Augustine on, I: 220;
    categories of, I: 121; and Christianity,
    III: 57; cooperation of power, II: 86;
    and divine providence, II: 165;
    Easternization of, I: 186; evolution
    of, I: 186; expansion of, I: 150;finality
    of, I: 123-24; fragmentation of, VI: 51,
    52; and France, III: 57, 79; and Francis
    of Assisi, II: 140; III: 243; in Golden
    Bull, III: 205-10; in Innocent III's
    Deliberatio Papae, II: 175-77; Lupold
    of Babenburg on, III: 214-16; and
    orbis terrarum, I: 121; III: 154; and
    phases of dissociation, VI: 52; politia,
    V: 58; reconstruction of, III: 79; and
    religion, II: 95; Rienzo on, III: 236,
    243; IV: 213; of Rome, I: 123-24, 135,
    144, 149-50; III: 154, 236; VI: 37;
    temporal political order of, II: 93; and
    title imperator, I: 189; in Tractatus
    Politicus,
VII: 131-32; William of
    Ockham on, III: 125. See also Empires
Imperium et ecclesia in natione, VI: 72
Imperium principum, V: 52
Imperium Romanum, I: 135, !44, 150;
    V: 2I9, 232, 236
Impura materia, V: 222
Im Schauen (in vision), VII: 214
Im Tiefsten (roots of existence), VII: 268
Inbegriff (total), VIII: 331
In-Between ( metaxy ), I: 41-42; V: 3
In capite at membris, III: 249
Incarnation, IV: 141
Incas, VII: 171
Incolae (inhabitants), III: 149
Incongruité notable, V: 202
In conspectu Dei (in the sight of God),
    V: 191
Index Prohibitorum Librorum, III: 112
India, II: 3, 35-36n2, 170; V: 131; VI: 38,
    39; VII: 105, 171; VIII: 126-27, 283
Indians. See American Indians
India Orientalis (Pigafetta), VII: 170
Indifferentism, III: 110
Indirect temporal powers of popes,
    V: 64-66
Individual history, V: 223-26
Individualism, I: 32-35
Indocti (uneducated), III: 90
Indulgences, IV: 229-31, 242, 245
Industrial Revolution, VII: 189
Industrial system, VI: 149; VIII: 133-34,
    230-32, 243-44, 306-9, 357-58, 370,
    371
Inequality: Condorcet on, VIII: 155-
    57; Grotius on inequalities among
    nations, VII: 55-56, 154; Locke on,
    VII: 149-51; Schelling on, VII: 223;
    Turgot on, VIII: 127-29. See also
    Equality
Inertia and ennui, VIII: 53-54
Infallibility, I: 37-39, 183; III: 111,
    124-25, 247
Inferno (Dante), III: 178
Infidelitas, II: 93
Infidels, V: 116, 117, 120, 127-28
Infinita (infinity), III: 258-59
Infinity: Bruno on, V: 173-75, 175n92;
    VII: 178-80, 182, 183, 211; Le Roy
    on, V: 147-49; mathematical infinite,
    V: 176-77; in ontological speculation,
    V: 177-79; Pascal on, VII: 182-83
In imperatorem promovendus, III: 206
Innate ( naif ) nature, V: 31, 35, 39
Inner return, VII: 219-20, 249-50
Inner-worldly thought. See Intramun-
    dane thought
Innocent II, Pope, II: 146
Innocent III, Pope: and Albigensian
    War, II: 106, 139, 155; church
    organization of, II: 111; compared
    with Boniface VIII, III: 38; diplomatic
    skill of, II: 147; and Franciscans,
    IV: 149; and Francis of Assisi, II: 138;
    and Germany, III: 206-7; imperial
    construction under, II: 146, 149; and
    Inquisition, V: 78; and John Lackland,
    III: 131
--Work: Per Venerabilem, II: 174-77;
    III: 55
Innocent IV, Pope, II: 146
In ordine ad finem spiritualem, V: 65
In parmenidem (Ficino), VI: 105
Inquietude (uneasiness), VIII: 53
Inquisition: and artists, II: 195n; and
    Bruno, V: 170; VII: 207; and Calvin,
    IV: 276; and Galileo, VI: 186-89; and
    Gnostic mater Francisca Hernandez,
    IV: 195; and Jesuits, III: 112; and Pope
    Innocent III, V: 78; as response to
    heretics, II: 155, I95n; IV: 178; in
    Spain, IV: 220; Vico on, VI: 15, 15n,
    87; Warburton on, VI: 156-57
In Search of Order (Voegelin), I: 47n53;
    II: 16-17, 16nn25-26
Insipientes, III: 261-63
Instinct, III: 263
Institutes (Justinian), I: 198
Institutes of the Christian Religion
    (Calvin), IV: 13-14, 239, 269-91;
    VIII: 108
Institutions. See Catholic Church;
    Church; Government
Institutio Principis Christiani
    (Erasmus), IV: 6-8, 91-92, 95n5,
    97-105, 98n12, 115
Institutio Traiani (Plutarch), II: 121
Instrumentalization of humans, VIII: 6,
    58-59, 83
Instrument of Government (Cromwell),
    VII: 110
Intellect. See Mind
Intellectuals: and Averroism, II: 187-
    98, 208; Bakunin on, VIII: 268-70;
    Christian, II: 208-9; Comte on
    political intellectuals, VIII: 234-36;
    Condorcet on, VIII: 149-53, 235;
    Dante on, IV: 208-12; Erasmus as,
    IV: 96-97, 108-9; Giles of Rome as,
    III: 52, 67; Hölderlin on, VII: 247;
    and international revolution in
    nineteenth century, VIII: 286-87; life
    of, III: 266; meaning of term, IV: 237;
    men of letters, IV: 46, 67, 71; More
    on, IV: 113-14, 121; Nicholas of Cusa
    on, III: 261-62; pleonexia of, IV: 8, 9,
    109, 129-30; and politics, III: 66-69;
    and Siger de Brabant, II: 187-98, 232;
    and will to power, III: 48-49
Intellectus, I: 39; III: 180
Intellectus agens, V: 204n42
Intellectus unus, I: 37
Intelletti sani, IV: 210
Intelligentia (understanding), VI: 97
Intelligere (understanding), VI: 96, 98
Intelligo ut credam, VI: 60
Intencio populi, III: 158
Intentio, VI: 61, 129
Intentio animi, I: 206; VII: 258
Intercivilizational relations, V: 115-17,
    121, 131-33
Inter gentes, V: 122
Inter homines, V: 122
International Brothers, VIII: 289
Internationalism, IV: 138; V: 108-11;
    VIII: 76-77, 140-41, 219-20
International law, I: 199, 220; VII: 53-54
International Social-Democratic
    Alliance, VIII: 284-85
International Workingmen's Associa-
    tion, VIII: 283, 284
Interpolity relations: distinction
    between interstate and interciviliza-
    tional relations, V: 115-17; and Great
    Design, V: 111-12; imperialism,
    V: 121-28; and intercivilizational
    relations, V: 115-17, 121, 131-33;
    and internationalism, V: 108-11; and
    interstate law, V: 113-15; interstate
    relations, V: 115-17; and just war,
    V: 117-21, 125, 127, 128; later
    development of intercivilizational
    relations, V: 131-3 3; Vitoria on,
    V: 114-31; and Vitoria's personality,
    V: 128-31
Interregna, II: 146; III: 39, 71, 194,
    196-99, 203
Interstate relations and interstate law,
    V: 113-17, 133
Intramundane religiousness: de-
    scription of, VIII: 82-85, 121; of
    French Revolution, VIII: 213-14;
    in Helv‚tius, VIII: 6, 82; in Marx,
    VIII: 343
Intramundane thought: definition of,
    II: 9-10; and Francis of Assisi, II: 142-
    43, 191; and Frederick II, II: 144, 148-
    59, 191; independent intellectual,
    II: 187-98; intramundane Christ,
    II: 142-43; and intramundane
    forces, VI: 31-33, 41-42, 44-51;
    intramundane history, VI: 42-45,
    108-9; and Joachim of Fiore, II: 130-
    34, 191; and John of Salisbury,
    II: 120-26, 191; and meaning of
    life, IV: 47-48, 47n13; national
    consciousness as determining factor
    in politics, II: 148, 149; poverty,
    II: 137-38, 139, 178, 180, 198-203,
    204; problem of intramundane order,
    II: 109-11; rulership, II: 157-58; and
    Siger de Brabant, II: 191-93, 201;
    statecraft and statesmen, II: 148-
    49; Thomas Aquinas, II: 207-32;
    utilitarian ethics, II: 193-95, 196n.
    See also History; Law; Politics;
    Roman law
Introduction à la connaissance de
1'esprit humain
(Vauvenargues),
    VIII: 49-51
Introduction aux travaux scientifiques
    du XIXe siécle
(Saint-Simon),
    VIII: 232
Inventions, V: 146, I46n16
Inversion: by Engels, VIII: 339; by
    Helvétius, VIII: 51-52, 82; by Marx,
    VIII: 320-39; and partiality, VII: 196-
    98
Investiture Controversy: and
    Benedictine order, II: 69; and Cardinal
    Humbert, II: 91-94; and Concordat
    of Worms, II: 68, 91, 105; essential
    question of, II: 67-68; III: 79, 116;
    and Gregory VII, II: 67, 82, 87-91;
    literature concerning, II: 37; and
    papacy, II: 11-12, 8l-82, 85-91; papal
    and imperial arguments on, II: 85-86,
    85-86n8; III: 40, 92, 193; VI: 53; and
    Pataria movement, II: 84-85; and
    rise of intramundane forces, III: 103;
    root of, II: 61; and sacrum imperium,
    III: 66; and simony, II: 11-12, 83-84;
    as spiritual culmination of Middle
    Ages, II: 29; III: 15; transformation of
    evocations by, II: 10, 12, 14, 66; and
    York Tracts, II: 94-101
Invictus (the unconquered), I: 193
Invidiosi, III: . 67
Ipsorum adjutorio, III: 263
Ira Dei, IV: 52, 53, 59
Ireland, II: 64; IV: 153; VII: 109, 113
Irenaeus, I: 203; VII: 7
Irenäus: Die Geduld des Reifens
    (Balthasar), VII: 6
Irene, Empress, II: 58
Ireton, Henry, VII: 83
Irnerius, II: 13, 168
Isaac, II: 130; IV: 169
Isabella of Castile, III: 69; IV: 36
Isaiah, Book of, I: 115-19, 142n, 150,
    153-54, 163; II: 98n26; III: 182;
    IV: 166, 211n; VIII: 224-25, 225n72
Isidore of Seville, Saint, I: 198, 203;
    II: 44n6, 47, 221, 228
Islam: and Bodin's Heptaplomeres,
    V: 208-10; Bossuet on, VI: 38-
    39; condemnation of, II: 54; and
    conflict with Orthodox Church,
    I: 184; and conversion, VIII: 146;
    Crusades' attack on, II: 72, 73;
    eschatological element of, II: 8;
    European expansion against, II: 78-
    79; VI: 38; and faylasuf, II: 185-87;
    and hierarchy, II: 202; Hooker on,
    V: 94; influence of, II: 211; IV: 151;
    Machiavelli on, IV: 71; migration
    of, II: 67; missionary activity
    against, VII: 286; Montesquieu on,
    VII: 166; orthodoxy of, II: 185-87; and
    Paulicians, IV: 158-59; philosophy
    of, II: 154, 178, 181-87, 187-89n14;
    III: 100; and raids onItaly, II: 81; and
    religion and government, II: 3; as
    religious movement, I: 183; Spanish
    war against, II: 149; and Spinoza,
    VI: I: 129-30; and Sufism, VIII: 27;
    toleration not extended to, VII: 145;
    Vitoria on, V: 119
Isocrates, I: 69, 93
Isolationism, VII: 90
Isolation of political thinker, III: 66-68
Israel: and covenant, I: 109-17, 205;
    V: 52-53, 54, 244; covenant between
    Yahweh and, I: 109, 111, 112;
    VII: 138; covenant with David, I: 109,
    111; David as king of, I: 109, 111;
    eschatological sentiment in, I: 114-
    16, 122; IV: 17 3; faith in Yahweh,
    I: 114, 117; fate of, VI: 158;historical
    significance of, I: 108-9; VI: 35, 37,
    123-24; importance of Voegelin's
    ideas on, I: 10, 12; kingship in, I: 109,
    111, 112, 114-16, 228; II: 47, 49;
    law of, I: 112-13, 201n5; II: 98n25,
    129; Marquis du Chatelet on, VI: 36;
    monotheism of Hebrews, VII: 211;
    national personality of, I: 111; and
    primary democracy, I: 110; and
    principles of government, II: 220-22;
    prophets of, I: 111, 112, 115-19, 150;
    IV: 110; punishment of, I: 117, 118;
    and rationality of conduct, I: 113-14;
    and revelation as symbolic form,
    I: 53; sinfulness of, I: 117, 118; and
    Suffering Servant, I: 116-19, 150;
    II: 45; Thomas Aquinas on, II: 229,
    231. See also Hebrews; Judaism and
    Jews; Moses
Israel and Revelation (Voegelin), I: 2,
    18
Istoria civile del regno di Napoli
    (Giannone), VI: 85
Istoria d'ltalia (Guicciardini), IV: 34n
Istorie Florentine (Machiavelli),
    III: 233-34; IV: 41, 87
Istria, II: 54
Italianità myth, III: 77-78
Italy: and Abyssinia, I: 124; anchoritic
    orders, II: 70; Byzantine power broken
    in, II: 54-55; Cardinal Albornoz and
    return of pope to Rome, IV: 38-
    39; Castruccio Castracani as hero,
    IV: 56-59; ciompi revolt in Florence,
    IV: 40-41; city-states in, III: 10,
    154, 217-18, 220-23, 228, 230-
    33; VI: 12-13, 82-83; and Cola di
    Rienzo, III: 233-44; commune of
    Rome in, III: 233-34; conspiratorial
    organizations of, VIII: 132; and
    Council of Constance, III: 249;
    Counter-Reformation in, VI: 14;
    Dante on, III: 74, 78; "decadence"
    period in, VI: 13, 83-84, 96; disorders
    in, V: 143; and Fourth Crusade,
    III: 221-22; French invasion of,
    IV: 32, 36-38, 71n53, 75, 106, 263;
    V: 41; VI: 13, 83; German control
    of, III: 195-96, 197, 203, 206, 207,
    215; Germanic invasion of, II: 52-53;
    heretical popular movement in,
    II: 80; hermetic writings in, VIII: 20;
    and humanistic historiography,
    IV: 41-42; institutional creativeness
    in, III: 143; institutionalization and
    rationalization in, IV: 38; Lombards
    in, II: 30-33, 47, 48, 55; III: 195;
    Machiavelli on, III: 78; IV: 37-38, 56,
    68, 76, 81; and Marsilius of Padua
    on limited government, III: 91-94;
    Medicis in, IV: 32, 33, 36, 40, 72n;
    municipalization and emigration
    in, VI: 14, 84-85; and myth of the
    Italianità, III: 77-78; Napoleon's and
    corporative constitution for kingdom
    of, VIII: 232n78; and nationalism,
    III: 78, 237-44; IV: 204-5; VII: 170;
    national militia in, IV: 38, 38n;
    Norman rule in, II: 144; Ostrogoth
    kingdom in, II: 32, 52, 54; Pataria
    movement in, II: 84-85, 96, 106, 155,
    194, 221; IV: 148-49, 150; Paulicians
    and Bogomils in, IV: 138; Piero de'
    Medici expelled from Florence,
    IV: 32; political technicism on,
    III: 101-2; political units in 1494,
    IV: 36; politics of, VI: 12-14, 82-
    85; regnum in, III: 10; religion in,
    III: 91; IV: 68; Renaissance in, II: 35;
    republicanism in, IV: 32-33; return
    of pope to Rome from Avignon,
    IV: 38-39; Rienzo and reformatio et
    renovatio
in, III: 11; Risorgimento
    in, VI: 13, 83; Rome, III: 233-37, 239,
    243; IV: 60; social structure in towns
    of, III: 230-31; spiritual nationalism
    and military unification in, III: 243-
    44; town politics of, II: 221, 222;
    III: 93-94; trauma of 1494 in, IV: 36-
    38; unification of, III: 11, 243-44;
    universities in, IV: 219; Venice,
    III: 220-23, 228, 232-33, 240; virtù
    in, IV: 71; Visigoths in, II: 44n6; Vita
    di Castruccio Castracani,
IV: 55-59.
    See also Popes; Rome; and other
    cities
Itinerarium (William of Rubruck),
    II: 79; IV: 44
It-reality, II: 16, 17n26
Ius (bond of right order), I: 137,217-18
Ius civile (civil law), I: 195
Ius divinum (divine law), I: 195
Ius gentium (law of nations), I: 195,
197-99; III: 55, 97n; VII: 54
Ius naturale (natural law), I: 195,
    197-99; III: 97n
Ius naturale (Right of Nature), VII: 66
Ius positivum (positive law), I: 195
Ivan the Great, III: 69

Jacob, II: 130; IV: 169
Jacobi, Friedrich Heinrich, VI: 89;
    VII: 198
Jacobites, VI: 155
Jacobitism, I: 75-76
Jacobus, Jurist, II: 172
Jaeger, Werner, I: 9; VII: 229n63
James, William, I: 18; VIII: 15
James (brother of Jesus), I: 175
James I, King, II: 85; V: 60; VII: 74-77,
    80, 138
James II, King, III: 59n9
Janet, Paul, V: 32
Janet, Pierre, VI: 2, 4, 6
Janus, temple of, I: 221
Japan, II: 75; V: 132-33; VII: 166
Japhet, II: 44n6
Jaspers, Karl, VII: 199, 259n21,
    292n109; VIII: 245
Jean of Jandun. See John of Jandun
Jensen, Merrill, VII: 87
Jeremiah, Book of, I: 115, 117; IV: 225;
    VIII: 225n72
Jerome, Saint, IV: 90, 95
Jerusalem, destruction of, I: 175
Jerusalem Church, I: 175
Jesuits: beginning of order, V: 60-61;
    compared with Calvinists, V: 47;
    compared with Dominicans, V: 63;
    and Comte, VIII: 185; and Counter-
    Reformation, V: 17; decline of,
    V: 62-64; Helvétius on, VIII: 79-80,
    132; and Inquisition, III: 112; leaders
    of, V: 62; moderate persons' response
    to, VII: 47; and monoarchomachism,
    V: 40-41, 59-60; organization of
    order, V: 61-62; Pascal on, VII: 254;
    and Puritans, V: 60; and Reformation,
    V: 62; and scholasticism, V: 4;
    significance of, IV: 220; in specific
    countries, V: 62, 64; and spiritual
    unity of Europe, V: 64-69; and Thirty
    Years War, V: 64, 90
Jesus Christ: apocalyptic experience
    of, and community, I: 30-32; apostles
    of, I: 152; birth of, I: 221; Bodin
    on, V: 182, 189, 190n11, 238, 242;
    Calvin on, IV: 286; in Christian
    doctrine generally, VI: 174; M.
    Claude on, VI: 49-50; Comte
    on, VIII: 196-99, 201-2; as cult
    god, I: 183-84; d'Alembert on,
    VIII: 95; death of, I: 151, 163, 164;
    and divine incarnation of order,
    VIII: 28; divine origin of, I: 89-
    90; epiphany of, VIII: 24; and
    episcopal authority, II: 203; and
    epochal change, I: 168, 212, 220;
    Erasmus on, IV: 92-98, 95n5, 103,
    104; eschatological hardness of,
    I: 158-59; Fifth Monarchy of, IV: 167-
    73; Frederick II and Christ as
    cosmocrator, II: 157; in Gethsemane,
    II: 124; in Glimpse of Sion's Glory,
    IV: 145-48; God's working through,
    in New Testament, IV: 164; as head
    of invisible church, III: 188; healing
    mana of, I: 154-55, I55n, 163, 164;
    historical, III: 110; Hölderlin on,
    VII: 247; humanity versus divinity
    of, I: 183-84; imitation of, and Francis
    of Assisi, II: 140-43, 150, 157, 185,
    198, 204; III: 108, 120; as incarnation
    of the Light of Truth, I: 180; and
    infallibility of church, III: 124; and
    insufficiency of critical exegesis of
    Gospels, I: 151-52; intramundane
    Christ, II: 142-43; Joachim of Fiore
    on, III: 14; and Judas, VIII: 264;
    kingdom of, I: 214; IV: 165-68; on
    kingdom of God, I: 169; and kings,
    III: 190; Last Supper of, I: 152; and
    leader on ass, I: 116; life of, I: 151-
    52; Locke on, VI: 179; as logos,
    I: 107, 201; Luther on, IV: 253-55,
    255n; Marsilius of Padua on, III: 98,
    100; Messianic consciousness of,
    I: 151-54, 162-63; and metanoia,
    I: 151, 154-55; mystical body of,
    I: 155, 167-68, 170-71; IV: 117, 132,
    140; as myth, VI: 55; and nature of
    Gospels, I: 152-54; Nicholas of Cusa
    on, III: 258, 259, 264-65; Nietzsche
    on, VII: 256, 260; occupation of,
    IV: 144; omission of, from Comte's
    Calendrier, VIII: 196, 201; parables
    of, I: 153; and Paracletes, IV: 191-
    92; and Paul's theory of Christian
    community, I: 167-68, 170-71; in
    Piers Plowman, III: 180-83; pneuma
    of, VI: 6, 62; on poor andwealthy,
    I: 156-61; and popes, I: 38; III: 121,
    189-90, 192; poverty of, III: 185,
    192; priestly function of, II: 98;
    redemption through, II: 98; IV: 162,
    255n; V: 169; refusal of dominium
    over the world, III: 119, 119n16;
    Resurrection of, I: 163-66; and
    revolution against Torah, I: 111;
    Rienzo compared with, III: 240; royal
    function of, II: 12, 98-99; sacrifice
    of, IV: 142; Schelling on Dionysus
    and, VII: 230-33, 243; as second
    Adam, I: 170-71, I92n4; second
    appearance of, I: 166, 212; and Second
    Realm of history, II: 126, 129-30;
    and separation of spiritual and
    temporal powers, II: 53; and Sermon
    in the Plain, I: 156, 159-60, 161;
    and Sermon on the Mount, I: 156,
    161-62; VIII: 281; Spirit of Christ,
    IV: 222; Leslie Stephen on, VI: 173; as
    suffering Jesus, I: 19; II: 140-43, 150,
    157; Thomas Aquinas on, II: 210,
    211, 213, 223; Tolstoy on, VIII: 281;
    transubstantiation doctrine, IV: 224-
    28, 242-43; trial of, by Roman court,
    III: 78; "utopianism" of, IV: 110;
    William of Ockham on, III: 108, 110,
    119-21, 124; Wycliffe on, III: 188-90,
    192. See also Christianity; Corpus
    mysticum
(mystical body); God;
    New Testament; Trinity
Jews. See Hebrews; Israel; Judaism and
    Jews
Joachim of Fiore (Flora): on brotherhood
    of autonomous persons, II: 132-34;
    compared with Rienzo, III: 243, 329;
    compared with Thomas Aquinas,
    II: 231-32; Dante on, III: 79-8l;
    on decadence, II: 131; on divine
    revelation, IV: 198-99; in Evangelium
    aeternum,
II: 199, 213; and Francis
    of Assisi, II: 135, 137; on function
    of political thinker, II: 131-32;
    Grundmann on, III: 67n; on leader
    of Third Realm, II: 132; III: 72, 79,
    266; IV: 154, 164, 203; VI: 32; as
    leading figure, II: 106, 150; III: 66,
    104; VI: 33; mature spiritual man
    of, II: 134; and meaning of history,
    II: 130-31, 191; VI: 125; and medieval
    political thought generally, VI: 7;
    overview of thought of, II: 12; V: 145;
    in Reformation, IV: 177, 178, 191;
    and Schelling, VII: 230-31, 233-34,
    237;

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