CUMULATIVE INDEX

HISTORY OF POLITICAL IDEAS (VOLS 19-26)

Roman numerals preceding page numbers refer to the eight volumes in History of Political Ideas


Discours sur les passions de 1 'amour
    (Pascal), VII: 256, 278
"Discovery of the New Creation"
    (Collins), IV: 165-67
Disintegration: "civilizational
    disintegration," I: 40; Hellenism
    and spiritual disintegration, I: 69-84;
    from Middle Ages to Renaissance
    and Reformation, I: 30-40
Disjecta membra, VII: 241
Disputation of Leipzig, IV: 16, 220-23,
    224, 231
Disraeli, Benjamin, III: 142
Dissoluti, VI: 141
Divertissement (as flight from oneself;
    Pascal), VII: 258, 258n19, 264n33,
    281; VIII: 64, 65-66, 82
Divi Filius, I: 190
Divina Commedia (Dante), I: 34; III: 67-
    72, 67n, 73, 78-82, 80nn7-8; IV: 210n
Divina historia, V: 159
Divine Afflante Spiritus, III: 112n
Divine age, VI: 137, 138
Divine kingship: and Alexander, I: 89,
    91-93; Diotogenes on, I: 105-6;
    Ecphantus on, I: 106-7; Hellenic
    versus Oriental origins of, I: 102-3,
    105; Hellenistic king as animated
    law ( nomos empsychos ), I: 103-5;
    Hellenistic kingship, I: 101-7; and
    marriage of Antony and Cleopatra,
    I: 142; Plato and Aristotle on, I: 103-
    105. See also Kingship
Divine law, I: 195, 202; II: 123, 223-24,
    22, 8-29
Divine Man, IV: 186-87, 199
Divine Providence, VI: 129-33, 135,
    138, 145. See also God
Divini numinis metus (fear of God),
    V: 214
Divi Romanorum imperatores et reges,
    III: 206
Division of labor, VIII: 354-55, 356
Divisions of Nature (Erigena), IV: 152,
    155, 156-57, 160-63, 179
Divisio regnorum (division of realms),
    III: 55
Divus Iulius , I: 190
Docetological speculation, VIII: 330-
    37, 371
Docta Ignorantia (Nicholas of Cusa),
    III: 258-59, 259n25, 266, 266n
Doctrinalizations, II: 16
Dogmatomachy, I: 41
Dokesis (appearance), VIII: 330
Domina scienciarum, III: 52
Dominatum (sovereignty), V: 214-15
Dominic, Saint, III: 241; IV: 69, 86, 184
Dominicans: and academics, IV: 219-
    20; Baker on, III: 151; compared
    with Jesuits, V: 63; constitution
    of, III: 152-53; establishment of,
    II: 78-81, 211; founding of, VIII: 19;
    and Franciscan rivalry, IV: 183-
    85; missionary work of, II: 73; III: 171;
    and monarchomachism,
    V: 40-41; and Reformation, IV: 230;
    spiritualism and politics of, III: 20,
    56; and Thomas Aquinas, III: 66; VII: 193;
    and Vitoria, V: 129
Dominion, V: 193; VII: 100-101, 131-32
Dominion by grace doctrine, III: 185-87
Dominium, III: 117, 119, 119n16, 169
Dominium generale, III: 120
Dominium particulare, III: 51
Dominium politicum et regale
    (Fortescue), III: 23, 155-57
Dominium regale, III: 23, 155-56
Dominium tantum regale, III: 160
Dominus, V: 59
Dominus et Deus, I: 191
Dominus mundi, II: 149; III: 207
Dominus noster (our lord), I: 194
Domitian, I: 191
Domus divina, I: 193
Donation of Constantine, II: 60, 60n,
    90, 170; III: 57, 191
Donation of Pepin, II: 57, 60
Donatism, I: 206, 208-9, 211, 213
Donner, Henry W., IV: 109n33
Dorpius, Martin, IV: 94
Dostoevsky, Fyodor, II: 132; IV: 117n47;
    VIII: 12, 218
Dottrina del Fascismo (Mussolini),
    VII: 297n126
"Double life, " VII: 218-19
Douleur (pain), VIII: 53
Dove, Alfred, II: 48
Doxography, parekbasis of, I: 42
Dreck (old filth), VIII: 305
Dreyfus, Alfred, VIII: 86, 172
Dritte Reich (Third Realm), I: 182
Driver, C. H., VII: 148n6
Droit commun, III: 254
Dualisme chez Platon, les Gnostiques
    et les Manichéens
(Pétrement), VII: 6
Du Bellay, Joachim, V: 29
Dubois, Pierre, III: 10n8, 39-40, 61-65,
    63-64n, 72, 77, 104, 239; V: 112
Ducasse, Pierre, VIII: 174, 180n23, 182,
    192, 193
Ducatus Romanus, III: 164
Duce, III: 80n7
Dumas, George, VIII: 168-69, 170
Dumont, Etienne, VIII: 72n65
Duncker, Hermann, VIII: 314-15n8
Dunning, William A., I: 5, 13; VI: 2-5,
    6,7
Dunoyer, Charles, VIII: 216-19
Duns Scotus, John, II: 81; III: 106, 109,
    169, 181n14; IV: 93, 94, 183, 237;
    V: 63
Du Pape (Maistre), VIII: 220, 222
Dupin, Ellies, VI: 48-49
Durand (Durandus of Troarn), IV: 226
Durant, Guillaume, III: 56n3
Durras, Mlle, de, VI: 49n16
Dutch East India Company, VII: 56
Duty, Stoics on, I: 99
Duveyrier, Henri, VIII: 168
Dux (leader), II: 130-32, 135, 159; III: 80,
    80nn7-8, 183, 242; V: 145; VI: 119;
    VII: 231, 247
Dux e Babylone, II: 130
Eastern Christianity, II: 165-66
Eastern Europe, I: 124, 232
Eastern Roman empire, IV: 71
East Frankish kingdom, III: 194-96
Ecce Homo (Nietzsche), VII: 261
Ecclesia (community), II: 8, 139-40,
    156-571 201-2; III: 41, 47, 261
Ecclesia Anglicana, V: 74, 75
Ecclesia Christi, III: 260
Ecclesia diaboli, V: 207
Ecclesia spiritualis, IV: 154
Ecclesiastical. See Church
Ecclesiastical Appointments Act of
    1534, III: 168
Ecclesiastical History (Mosheim),
    IV: 178, 195-96
Ecclesiastical Polity (Hooker), V: 80-
    88, 80n4, 92, 94-95, 101, 103; VII: 140
Ecclesia universalis, III: 247
Eck, Johann, IV: 220-22, 230, 231
Eckhart, Johannes Meister, I: 35;
    III: 169, 257, 265; IV: 136, 156,
    184-85, 202, 268; V: 63; VII: 235
Eclogue (Virgil), I: 141-43, 142n; II: 150;
    III: 73
Economic interdependence, VIII: 356
Economic phenomenalism, VII: 28,
    187-89
Economics, VII: 176
Economism, VI: 54
Ecphantus, I: 106-7, 115-16
Ecstasy of speculation, V: 172-7 3
Ecumenic Age (Voegelin), I: 13
Ecumenic Council, I: 174n
Ecumenic empires, II: 15
Edict of Nantes, V: 64
Education of a Christian Prince
    (Erasmus). See Institutio Principis
    Christiani
(Erasmus)
Edward I, King of England, III: 136, 138,
    148, 149, 160; V: 75
Edward VI, King of England, V: 78,
   90n22
Effectio, V: 235n75
Egidius of Colonna. See Giles of Rome
Egidius Romanus. See Giles of Rome
Ego:Nietzsche on, VII: 268, 269,
    293-95; Pascal on, VII: 284, 290;
    VIII: 66-67, 72
Ego cogitans, VII: 204, 206
Egophanic revolt, I: 135
Egophany, I: 35
Egypt:Christianity in, I: 176, 177;
    hierarchic concept, IV: 101;
    Monophysite policy, II: 54; and
    Moses, IV: 76; polytheism in, I: 227;
    Roman empire, II: 215; sun-god in,
    and Sun symbol, VII: 125; Turgot
    VIII: 127; and Venetians, III: 221;
    on, VI: 137; in Vita Tamerlani,
    IV: 52, 53
Einstein, Albert, VI: 50, 184,201n67,
    205, 214
Ekthesis (exposition of the faith), II: 54
Eleanor of Aquitaine, II: 145
Elect, IV: 280-90
Electio, V: 150
Electoral college, III: 210-14
"Electrocentrism," IV: 284
Electus in imperatorem, III: 2O8
Elegabalus, I: 193, 194
Éléments de la philosophie de Newton
    (Voltaire), VI: 58-60
Elia, Rabbi, V: 233, 234n75, 235
Elijah, IV: 286
Eliot, T.S., IV: 125; VIII: 62
Elites: short-circuit evocation of elites,
    VIII: 132-33; theory of new elite,
    IV: 289-91
Elizabeth, Empress of Russia, VIII: 224
Elizabeth I, Queen, V: 21, 60, 65, 78, 80
Ellegood, Donald, I: 14
Emancipation, Marx on, VIII: 352-53
Empedocles, VII: 247-48, 250
Emperors:: Augustus as name of,
    I: 187; authority of, and divine
    authority I: 204-5; Bodin on, V: 245;
    and Christian church, I: 207-8;
    deification of, I: 190-94; divinization
    of Roman and Italic emperors,
    I: 190-91; and Easternization of
    the empire, I: 186-87; evolution of
    princeps and his clientele, I: 187-88; in
    German state, IV: 243-44; Illyrian
    emperors, I: 193-94; imperator as
    name of, I: 189; oath of the princeps,
    I: 188-89; as princeps, I: 187-91;
    progression of, I: 186; protective
    function of, for the people, I: 204;
    protectorate of the princeps, I: 190; role
    of, IV: 208; and Roman heritage,
    I: 187-90; Spanish emperors, I: 191-
    92; spiritual power asserted over,
    I: 205; Syrian emperors, I: 192-93. See
    also
Carolingian empire; Empires;
    Holy empire ( sacrum imperium );
    Roman empire
Empires: categories of, I: 121; and city-
    states, III: 216-33; cycles of, I: 125-26;
    Daniel on sequence of, I: 121-22; and
    Dante, III: 78, 79-83, 239; and
    dissociation of power structure
    from the people, I: 120-21; election
    of German king-emperor, III: 206,
    208, 210-15, 21in; elimination
    of emperor after Hohenstaufen,
    III: 163; fatality and authority of,
    I: 123-24; and fortune as experience,
    I: 122-23; of France, III: 39-40, 59-61;
    in Germany, III: 39, 83-84, 194,
    205-16, 238-39; and Golden Bull,
    III: 198, 203-16, 228; Harrington
    on, VII: 100-101; and idea of world
    history, I: 124-25; independence
    from, and France, III: 55-57; and
    Lupold of Babenberg's juristic theory,
    III: 214-16; in Middle Ages generally,
    III: 6-7, 44-45; and orbis terrarum,
    I: 121, 125, 133, 139-40, 144; in
    Orosius's history, I: 222; Ottoman
    empire, III: 166n, 175; IV: 44-45,
    55; and Rienzo, III: 236-39; roles
    of German king-emperor, III: 207-
    8, 215-16; state- imperium and
    world- imperium, III: 205-10, 216;
    subimperial politics, III: 193-203;
    William of Ockham on, III: 122-
    23. See also Carolingian empire;
    Emperors; Holy empire ( sacrum
    imperium
); Imperium (dominion);
    Roman empire
Encomium Moriae (Erasmus), IV: 93-95
Encyclica imperatoris, II: 158
Encyclopédie, VIII: 43, 88, 89-91, 102,
    105, 106, 154
Encyclopedists, IV: 202; VI: 184; VIII: 43,
    335
Endgültigkeit ("ultimacy"), VIII: : 336
Endura, IV: 160
Enemies of spiritual order, V: 204-7
Enfantin, Barthélemy-Prosper,
    VIII: 168, 223, 233, 315n8
Engel-Janosi, Friedrich von, I: 14, 15,
    24n, 27, 29-30, 49n; III: 55, 97n; IV:
    81-82n66; VII: 11
Engels, Friedrich: docetological
    speculation of, VIII: 331-37, 371; on
    ethics, VIII: 336; on freedom,
    VIII: 73, 333-35; on Greek and
    Roman revolutionary movements
    of working population, I: 73; and
    Hegel, VIII: 331-34; idophobia of,
    VIII: 325-26, 326-27n18; inversion
    by, VIII: 339; language symbols of,
    VIII: 327; Lenin on, VIII: 315, 335; on
    progress, VIII: 33 5-36; on proletariat,
    IV: 150; VIII: 315-16n10, 363; on
    revolution, VIII: 313n7; on science,
    VIII: 230, 325-26, 335; on state dying
    away, VIII: 233, 315-16n10
—Works: Anti-Dühring, VIII: 233,
    339; Class Struggles in France,
    VIII: 313; Marx-Engels Gesamtaus-
    gabe,
VIII: 303; Zur Geschichte
    des Bunds der Kommunisten,

England: Act for Submission of the
    Clergy in, V: 74; Act in Restraint of
    Appeals, V: 75; Act of Settlement in,
    VIII: 214; Act of Supremacy in, V: 20,
    73, 74-76, 78-80, 89; alcohol use
    VI: 152-53; apostatic revolt in,
    VI: 10, 20-22; Arians or Socinians in,
    VI: 66; aristocracy in, VII: 74, 101;
    baronage in, III: 137-38; beginnings
    political thought, V: 70-74; bribery
    V: 71-72; Carolingian influence
    national character of, III: 129;
    103; causa justa of Anglo-
    German war, IV: 127-28; church in,
    III: 129, 130, 138-39, 143, 167-70,
    Church of England, V: 20-21,
    40, 74-90, 98; VI: 153-56; civil
    service in, III: 131; Civil War in,
    III: 141; IV: 151; VII: 73, 84-85,101,
    106, 139; clergy in, III: 138-39; and
    Clericis Laicos, III: 43, 44; common
    law in, III: 130; commonwealth
    of, V: 74-78; compared with
    continental development, III: 140-
    41; consciousness in, V: 72-73;
    constitutionalism in, II: 222; III: 22-
    24, 128, 129, 134, 141-45, 149;
    IV: 137; VI: 156, 160-61, 172;
    VII: 24, 51, 168; and Council of
    Constance, III: 249; Culverwel's
    reason in, VI: 167-69; dissolution of
    monasteries in, V: 76-77; Elizabethan
    period in, V: 21, 71, 78, 80; and estate
    of the king, III: 160-62; and European
    balance of power, III: 121; feudalism
    in, II: 117; III: 136; Fortescue on
    political structure of realm of,
    III: 155-62; and France, IV: 106;
    Gladstone-Newman controversy
    in, VI: 161-63; Glorious Revolution
    in, V: 91; VI: 154-55; VII: 107, 137;
    VIII: 214; Gunpowder Plot in,
    VII: 53; and healing power of king,
    III: 59n9, 122; Hooker's Christian
    commonwealth, V: 80-88; and
    Hundred Years War, III: 40, 62,
    128, 141, 210; IV: 35; institutions
    of, III: 135-43; insularity of, and
    absence of disturbing factors,
    III: 128-31; internal disorder in,
    during fourteenth and fifteenth
    centuries, III: 68-69; Jesuits in, V: 64;
    John of Salisbury on, II: 216; kingship
    in, II: 145-46; III: 11, 57, 69, 93, 127,
    128, 135-37, 160-62, 167; labor
    and labor movement in, III: 142-43,
    175-76; "Lancastrian experiment"
    in, III: 155; and legal categories
    interjected into conflicts of ideas
    and historical forces, V: 27-28; and
    Locke's reason, VI: 171-79, 172; Lollard
    movement in, IV: 139; and
    loss of the concrete, VI: 163-8 3; and
    Magna Carta, II: 120, 147-48; III: 23,
    131-38, 153; and materialization of
    external world, VI: 164-65; medieval
    "hangover" in, VII: 73-74; merchants
    in, III: 149; middle class in, III: 139,
    143; VII: 74, 101; military in, III: 130-
    31, 161, 161n; model polity of
    eighteenth century, VI: 150-63; More on
    conditions in, IV: 121-22; national
    bourgeoisie in, IV: 205; national
    characteristics of, VI: 9, 10,
    11, 73; national church in, II: 100;
    national cosmion in, VII: 170; and
    nationalism, III: 29, 127-62, 194-95,
    199, 200, 216, 239; and Norman
    conquest, II: 30, 111, 119, 132, 144,
    148, 216; III: 129, 195; V: 27, 70,
    103; VII: 98; Patarenes in, IV: 150;
    Peasant Revolt in, III: 68, 176; IV: 150;
    political articulation and
    integration in, III: 137-41, 151-53,
    231-32; political violence in, VII: 53;
    Poor Law in, VII: 108; Protestantism
    in, IV: 137; V: 19-20, 70; VI: 10,
    51n, 75-76; and psychologization
    of the self, VI: 165-67; purge of
    Church of England in, VI: 153-56;
    rationalization and centralization
    in, V: 27, 70; readmission of Jews
    to, VII: 127; and the realm, III: 154;
    Reformation in, I: 114; III: 130, 172; V: 19-
    21, 27, 70; Reform period of
    nineteenth century in, III: 139, 142; VII:
    83, 107, 157; representation
    in, III: 22-24, 145-54; Restoration
    period in, VII: 24, 107, 137; return
    to Catholicism under Mary Tudor,
    V: 21, 71-72; revolution in, II: 85; V: 27,
    52, 60; VI: 11, 12, 33, 78, 80; VIII: 348;
    royal authority in, II: 119; as
    schismatic nation, VI: 75-76; search
    for concrete in, VI: 20-22, 149-215;
    spiritualism in, and Piers Plowman,
    III: 175-84; stagnant population
    during eighteenth century, VI: 151-
    52; stateless political society in,
    VII: 25; Stuart kings in, VII: 106, 110,
    138; suffragette movement in,
    VIII: 282; symbols of, III: 144-45;
    theory of government in, VII: 107;
    time structure of closure in, VI: 79-
    81; and Toland on Christianity,
    VI: 179-83; totalitarian government
    in, V: 74-75; towns in, III: 136,
    217; Tudor monarchy in, III: 69,
    167, 234; IV: 35; universities in,
    IV: 219; versus Continental political
    thought, VII: 106-7; Warburton's
    political sermons in, VI: 156-61; and
    Wars of the Roses, III: 68-69; IV: 35;
    VII: 74, 101; and Whichcote's reason,
    VI: 169-71; in World War I, V: 28;
   writs of summons in, III: 148-51.
    See also English Parliament; English
    Revolution; and specific monarchs
English Parliament: and Agreement
    of the People,
VII: 81-83; Bodin
    on, V: 249; VI: 11, 76; Chrimes on,
    III: 155n19; and clash with James
    I, VII: 76; and Cromwell, VII: 110,
    112-14; dissolutions of, during
    English Revolution, VII: 112-14;
    establishment of, V: 70-72; and
    Great Protestation of 1621, VII: 76;
    Hume on, VII: 157-58; influence
    in Europe, III: 140; influence on
    English society, III: 145; and limited
    monarchy, VII: 139-40; powers
    and prestige of, V: 27; VII: 69, 79,
    82; royal influence on, III: 136-39;
    secularization of spiritual power,
    V: 74, 78-79; and settlement of 1688,
    VII: 139, 157; spiritual authority
    of, V: 8 7-8 8; struggle between
    landlord and merchant members of,
    and the state, VII: 108-9; Thomas
    Aquinas's influence on, II: 221. See
    also
Representation
English Revolution: Agreement of
    the People
during, VII: 81-83,
    97; and American Declaration of
    Independence, VII: 85-85; and army,
    VII: 80-81, 83; Charge and Sentence
    against Charles I during, VII: 84-
    85, 105, 112, 139; and Civil War,
    VII: 73, 84-85, 101, 106, 139; and
    closure, VI: 12, 79-81; compared
    with Bismarck's Realpolitik, VI: 11; and
    Cromwell, VII: 104, 106, 107,
    109, 110-14, 141; and dissolutions
    of Parliament, VII: 112-14; divine
    kingship theory of James I, VII: 74-
    75, 77; emigration from England
    in seventeenth century, VII: 76-
    77, 85-92; factors influencing,
    V: 27; and franchise, VII: 83-84,
    110; Grand Remonstrance of 1641
    during, VII: 78, 79; and Harrington,
    VII: 100-103; Impeachment of 1642
    during, VII: 78; James I during, II: 85; VII:
    74-77, 80, 138; king's role during,
    VII: 75; Letter to Free-Born People of
    England
during, VII: 81-82; limited
    constitutional monarchy during,
    VII: 84; Mayflower Compact during,
    VII: 76-77; and Milton, VII: 92-96;
    Newcastle Proposition of 1646
    during, VII: 79; Oxford Proposition
    of 1643 during, VII: 79; Parliament's
    powers during, VII: 69, 79, 82; pattern
    of, VII: 85-86; Petition of
    Right of 1628 during, VII: 78; and
    popular sovereignty, VII: 82; Putney
    debates of 1647 during, VII: 83,
    110-12; restriction of royal power
    in 1620s-1640s, VII: 78; results of,
    VI: 33, 80; and settlement of 1688,
    VII: 139, 157; Solemn Engagement
    of the Army
during, VII: 80-81; Star
    Chamber abolished during, VII: 78; and
    struggle between landlord and
    merchant members of Parliament
    and the state, VII: 108-9; Triennial
    Act of 1641 during, VII: 79; Uxbridge
    Proposition of 1644 during, VII: 79;
    and Vindiciae contra tyrannos, V: 52;
    and Winstanley, VII: 96-100
Enlightenment: countermovement
    to, VI: 103; in France, V: 237; and
    free spirit, IV: 201; VII: 154; Greek
    enlightenment compared with
    Western enlightenment, IV: 83; and
    human progress, I: 210; as modern
    political movement, IV: 178; VI: 31-
    32; perfecti of, IV: 11; philosophers of,
    IV: 267-68; political egalitarianism
    of, I: 35; and Protestantism, IV: 4, 89;
    Voltaire on, VI: 50
Enneads (Plotinus), II: 184
Ennius, I: 187
Ennui, VII: 258, 258n19, 264n33,
    281-82; VIII: 53-54, 64-66, 68
Enoch, Book of, I: 150
Enosis (unity), II: 7
En Soph, VII: 133
Ens primum, II: 191
Entgötterung (dedivinization), VI: 55;
    VIII: 138
Entia Mathematica, VI: 202
Entwuerfe, III: 210n
Épater le bourgeois, VIII: 318
Ephesians, Epistle to, I: 32; II: 8; IV: 213,
    233
Ephesus, Council of, I: 176, 183-84
Epictetus, VII: 262, 263
Epicureans, I: 69, 75, 80-84; II: 184;
    V: 209; VI: 95n7, 117, 134-35; VII: 228,
    266
Epicurus, I: 80-84; VI: 112; VII: 58-59,
    257; VIII: 340
Epigoni, VIII: 341
Epigonism, IV: 94
Epikeia, III: 251n
Epinomis (Plato), V: 215
Epiphanes (god-apparent), I: 107
Episcopal authority, II: 203
Epistle of Barnabas, I: 210-11, 210n
Epistles: of Clement, II: 203; to
    Corinthians, I: 174-75; II: 7-8; III: 46,
    74; IV: 206, 207, 212n55, 225-26,
    226n, 235; to Galatians, IV: 225nn,
    255n, 257; to Hebrews, I: 167-72;
    IV: 85, 168, 272; V: 48-49; homonoia
    in Paul's epistles, I: 94; of John, I: 36;
    IV: 251; VII: 272; and Marcionite
    movement, I: 181; of Peter, V: 154;
    to Romans, II: 7-8; III: 45, 186;
    IV: 191n33. See also New Testament
Epistola ad capitulum generale (Francis
    of Assisi), II: 37n4
Epistola ad populorum rectores
    (Francis of Assisi), II: 37n4
Epistola Concordiae (Conrad of
    Gelnhausen), III: 246-47
Epistrophé , V: 198
Epistula ad herimannum Metensem
    (Gebhardt of Salzburg), II: 87n
Epistula ad Hildebrandum (Wenrich of
    Trier), II: 87n
Epistula XC (Seneca), I: 203
Epistula XII (Gelasius I), II: 53
Epochal consciousness, I: 149-51,
    168-70, 210-13, 220
Equality: and Christianity, I: 34-
    35, 37; IV: 144-45; Condorcet on,
    VIII: 155-58; d'Alembert on, VIII: 91-
    92; Helvétius on, VIII: 85-86; and
    mother cult, I: 95-97; as mythical
    evocation, I: 197; natural equality
    between humans, VI: 139-40; origins
    of, I: 95-98; in Roman law, I: 96; and
    sparks of divine substance in
    humans, I: 97-98; and Stoicism,
    I: 95-98, 134; Vico on, VI: 141, 142;
    Voegelin's early work on, I: 19. See
    also
Inequality; Liberty
Equilibrium, VII: 50
Erasmus, Desiderius: on ascetic prince,
    IV: 7-8, 91-92, 97-109, 116; and
    beginning of modernity, IV: 4, 5;
    Christianity of, IV: 7, 90-97, 98;
    compared with Hooker, V: 91;
    compared with La Boétie, V: 29, 34;
    compared with Luther, IV: 12, 14,
    236-37, 246, 267, 286; compared with
    Machiavelli, IV: 7, 91-92, 102, 106-8; V:
    34; compared with More, IV: 9,
    114-15, 126, 129; V: 34; compared
    with Voltaire, IV: 89; and Dorpius,
    IV: 94; and edition of works of Saint
    Jerome, IV: 90; on fortuna, IV: 91;
    historical blindness of, IV: 8, 93-94,
    108-9; as intellectual, IV: 96-97,
    108-9; introductory comments on,
    IV: 7-8; low opinion of common
    people, IV: 90, 99-101; on monarchy,
    IV: 106; on national hatreds, IV: 105,
    108; on power, IV: 105-9; on the
    Reformation, IV: 97; scholasticism
    criticized by, IV: 7, 90, 93-96,
    108; skill of, in covering attacks
    by alibis, IV: 95n5; theological
    training of, IV: 93; translation of
    New Testament into Greek and
    Latin, IV: 90; on virtue, IV: 101-5;
    Voegelin's evaluation of, IV: 107-9; on
    war, IV: 104-5, 104n30
    --Works: Encomium Moriae, IV: 93-
    95; Institutio Principis Christiani,
    IV: 6-8, 91-92, 95n5, 97-105, 98n12,
    115; Novum Instrumentum, IV: 92,
    95; Paraclesis, IV: 92, 93; Querela
    Pacis,
IV: 104n30
Erastianism, VII: 93
Eratosthenes, I: 93
Erewhon (Butler), IV: 113
Erigena, John (Johannes) Scotus:
    compared with Eckhart, IV: 184;
    compared with Thomas Collier,
    IV: 166; creation of original man,
    IV: 196; Dionysius Areopagita's
    influences on, IV: 10, 152-57,
    177, 201; V: 198; and doctrine of
    Gottschalk, IV: 153-54n; and free
    spirit, IV: 179; interpretations of,
    IV: 191; and mens humana, V: 223; and
    renovatio of fallen Adam, IV: 202; theories
    and doctrines of, IV: 160-66,
    185, 187
    --Works: Commentary on the Gospel
    of Saint John, IV: 154; De Divisions
    Naturae,
IV: 152, 156-57, 160, 162,
    179; Predestination, IV: 152-53
Ermanric, II: 33
Ernest, Archbishop of Prague, III: 239
Eros, II: 71; IV: 199, 250-51; V: 196; VII:
    244. See also Charity; Love
Erudizione, VI: 86
Esau, IV: 169
Eschatology: Christianity's indiffer-
    ence to social problems, I: 171-72; in
    early Christian church, II: 94; in
    Enlightenment period, IV: 178; and
    epiphany of Christ, VIII: 24;
    eschatological hardness of believers,
    I: 160-61; eschatological hardness
    of Jesus, I: 158-59; eschatological
    hatred, I: 160-61; eschatological
    violence, IV: 174-75; and evangelical
    councils, II: 137, 198; in Glimpse of
    Sion's Glory,
IV: 145-48; of Gospels,
    I: 158-59; and Helv‚tius, VIII: 87,
    99; and Investiture Struggle, II: 12; and
    Israel, I: 114-16, 122; IV: 173; and Marx, I:
    157-58; and Messiah,
    I: 166; and More's Utopia, IV: 118-
    19, 124; and Policraticus, II: 124; and
    Schelling, VII: 229-31, 238-39; Sermon
    on the Mount, I: 162; and
    Suffering Servant, II: 45; as symbol of
    Christ's kingdom, II: 8-9, 9n; in York
    Tracts,
II: 96
Eschaton (end), II: 8
Esdras, Book of, IV: 168, 169
Esotericism, of Spinoza, VII: 129-30
Esposito, IV: 58
Esprit (intellect, spirit), VII: 272, 278;
    VIII: 47, 102-3, 186
Esprit des Lois (Montesquieu), VII: 163-
    66, 172
Esprit humain (human intellect),
    VI: 40-42, 44, 46-47, 67; VIII: 127,
    136, 181, 193-94
Esquisse (Condorcet), VIII: 8, 8n,
    148-61, 149n60
Essai analytique sur les lois naturelles
    de 1'ordre social
(Bonald), VIII: 220
Essai sur les moeurs (Voltaire), VI: 34
Essay Concerning Human Under-
    standing
(Locke), I: 26; VI: 171-73,
    180; VII: 141; VIII: 44-46, 46-47n7,
    49, 51, 63
Essay Concerning Toleration (Locke),
    VII: 141
"Essence of man, " VII: 55. See also
    Human nature
Essentia, VI: 104
Essex, Earl of, VII: 109
"Essor empirique du républicanisme
    français" (Comte), VIII: 164-65
Estat de 1'église, III: 254
Estonia, III: 201, 217
État (state), V: 247; VIII: 144. See also    
    State
État théologique, VIII: 193
Eternal law, II: 13-14, 223-26
Eternal recurrence, V: 147-49
Ethics: of Christianity, IV: 141; and
    Kant, IV: 260; and Luther, IV: 259-60;
    of Machiavelli, IV: 64, 67, 82-85;
    and Newton, VI: 62; Pompanazzi on,
    IV: 91; and Siger de Brabant, II: 194,
    196n, 197-98; utilitarian ethics,
    II: 193-95; and Voltaire, VI: 61-64,
    71; and William of Saint Amour,
    II: 199-200; of work, II: 199-200. See
    also Morality
Ethics (Aristotle), III: 97n; IV: 237, 259;
    V: 117
Ethics (Spinoza), VII: 127, 128-29, 131
Ethnici philosophi, VI: 99
Être Suprême,L' VIII: 6,96, 206, 209,
    214
Etymologies (Isidore of Seville), I: 198
Eudaimonia, I: 99; III: 86, 87
Euergetes (benefactor), I: 107
Eugene IV, Pope, III: 250
Eugenius III, Pope, II: 71-72
Euler, Leonhard, VI: 198, 199,
    200, 213-14
Eurasian unity, II: 35n2
Eurocentrism, II: 2-4
Europe: and Asia, V: 140-45; Bakunin
    on corruption of the West,
    VIII: 266-67; balance of power
    in, III: 121; Bonald on, as "single
    family, " VIII: 220-21; Comte's
    political program on, VIII: 202-
    English 6; eastern Europe, I: 124, 232;
    Parliament's influence on,
    III: 140; Kant's "European Republic,"
    VIII: 219; league of sovereign states
    of, III: 63-64, 63-64n 72, 239;
    Rousseau's "European Republic,"
    VIII: 219. See also specific countries
Euryphieus, II: 44
Eusebius, Bishop, I: 221; II: 6-7
Evangelists, IV: 277n31. See also
    specific evangelists
Evangelium aeternum (Gerard of Borgo
    San Donino), II: 134, 198-99, 213-14
Evangelium Aeternum (Third Realm
    of the Spirit), III: 120, 243
Evangelium regni, II: 134
Evangelium Regni (Nicholas), IV: 191
Eve, IV: 197-99. See also Adam
Evil: Bakunin on, VIII: 294-96, 298-
    99; Bodin on, V: 201, 202, 205-
    7; Christian view of, VIII: 279; Erigena
    on, IV: 153; eschatologists
    on disappearance of, IV: 118; Hooker
    on, V: 94-95; and human intent,
    II: 193-94; and infidelitas, II: 93;
    Kropotkin on, VIII: 279; La Boetie
    on, V: 33-34; Locke on, VIII: 45-46,
    51; Luther on, IV: 253-54, 264, 265;
    Manichaean myth of, IV: 159; More
    on superbia (pride) and property,
    IV: 9, 120-25, 128; Nietzsche on,
    VII: 295-300; and papal authority,
    II: 177; Platonic view of, IV: 82;
    Pomponazzi on, IV: 91; power as
    source of, IV: 107; Prooemium on,
    II: 153; Siger de Brabant on, II: 194,
    194n27; Tolstoy on, VIII: 280-82; and
    tyranny, V: 37-38; virtue and vices,
    II: 136-37; Vitoria on, V: 119. See also
    Satan; Sin
Evocation: of Carolingian empire,
    II: 66; criticisms of Voegelin's use of,
    I: 52n6; definition of, II: 4, 5-6; III: 4;
    and domination of the spirit, II: 67-
    68; as formulations of wholeness,
    II: 5-6; of Francis of Assisi, II: 143;
    growth of, II: 65-68; holy empire as,
    II: 29-30, 37-38, 65-68; imaginative
    structures of, I: 53; of medieval
    empire, II: 66; of national kingdoms,
    II: 11; and national state, VII: 22;
    Platonic evocation, II: 183; political
    evocation, I: 228-31, 234-37; II: 4-5,
    5n11, 107-8; realists' response to,
    VII: 59-60; Sabine on, I: 51-52; and
    tension between idea and reality,
    II: 66-67; transformation of, by
    Investiture Struggle, II: 10, 12, 14,
    66; Voegelin's theory of, I: 52n6; VII: 10-
    11, 16-18, 21-22, 33
Evolution, VI: 53; VII: 27, 156, 184-87,
    186n6
Exceptional type of man, V: 201, 202
Exceptiones Petri, II: 162, 167
Exceptions (Gérard of Abbeville), II: 203
Excommunication, VI: 69-70; VII: 127,
    145
Execution function, V: 193
Executiva, III: 95
Exodus, Book of, II: 98n26
Exousia (governmental authority),
    I: 172n; II: 63
Experiences, I: 21
Explorations, III: 40
Expopulo erumpit regnum, III: 157
Expositio ad librum papiensem,
    II: 167-68
Exsurge Domine, IV: 231
Ezekiel, I: 46-47, 115; IV: 212n55
Ezra, I: 108, 182


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