CUMULATIVE INDEX

HISTORY OF POLITICAL IDEAS (VOLS 19-26)

Roman numerals preceding page numbers refer to the eight volumes in History of Political Ideas


Charlemagne: and Avars, II: 31; Bossuet
    on, VI: 39; and Charles IV, III: 204;
    coronation of, II: 11, 52, 58-59;
    divisions of empire after death of,
    II: 33; empire of, III: 215; fate of,
    III: 58, 58nn7-8; and foundation of
    Christian Europe, VIII: 220, 221,
    232; and Frankish-Roman empire,
    III: 195; V: 233; Lombard kingdom
    incorporated by, II: 32; and Mirror of
    Saint Augustine, II: 63; monument
    for, VIII: 169; and oath of allegiance,
    II: 119; and Occidental Republic,
    VIII: 202; as patron of Charles IV,
    III: 204; Saxon war of, II: 46; as
    symbol, I: 124; theocracy of, II: 37;
    title of, as ruler, II: 7n17
Charles I, King of England, VII: 84-8 5,
    105, 108, 112, 139
Charles II, King of France, II: 63
Charles IV, King of France, III: 204
Charles VI, King of France, III: 252
    401
Charles VII, King of France, III: 256;
    VI: 13, 83
Charles VIII, King of France, IV: 32
Charles X of France, I: 156; VIII: 212
Charles IV, Emperor, III: 203-5, 209,
    236, 239, 2, 41, 242
Charles V, Emperor, IV: 91, 97, 108;
    V: 25
Charles Martel, II: 57
Charles of Anjou, III: 39, 49n6, 59-61,
    104
Charles of Basse-Lorraine, III: 58n8
Charles the Bald, IV: 152
Charles the Bold, III: 223-24
Charpentier, Jacques, V: 56
Charron, Pierre, V: 30
Charter of Charity, II: 70-71
Chateaubriand, François-Auguste-
    René de, IV: 112; VIII: 225
Châtelet-Lorraine, Marquise du, VI: 34-
    35, 38, 39n
Chauri Chaura affair, VIII: 283
Checks and balances, V: 47
Chef de parti (party leader), VII: 120
Chefs des travaux (industrial
managers), VIII: 243
Chelcicky, Peter, III: 175, 175n6
Chemin-Dupontès, VIII: 209
Chicago Oriental Institute, I: 9, 51
Chierzey, Synod of, IV: 154n
Childeric, II: 57
Chiliastic movements, III: 171; IV: 179-
    80; VIII: 225n72
China: and Asiatic migration, II: 31,
    35n; and civilizational process,
    IV: 132, 134; European interpretation
    of, II: 3; on hierarchy, IV: 101; history
    of, VI: 109, 122-23; importance
    to Western civilization, IV: 51n; V:
    146n16; missions to, II: 79; Montesquieu
    on, VII: 166; myth and
    nature, IV: 224n; Turgot on, VIII: 126-
    27; unification of, IV: 43; Vitoria's
    influence on, V: 131; Voltaire on,
    VI: 39; Western expansion in, V: 132-
    33; VI: 38; yin and yang symbols,
    I: 26-27
Ch'in Shi Huang Ti, IV: 43
Chioggia, War of, III: 220
Chiron, IV: 78
Chomiakow, Alexei, IV: 279-80n35
Chrimes, S. B., III: 155, 155n19, 158
Christ. See Jesus Christ
Christenheit oder Europa (Novalis),
    VIII: 220
Christenmensch, II: 202
Christianae Religionis Institutio
    (Calvin). See Institutes of the
    Christian Religion
(Calvin)
Christian commonwealth, V: 80-88; VII:
    69-70
Christian communist commonwealth,
    VII: 97-100
"Christian estate, " IV: 232-33, 239-41,
    244-45, 258-59, 262; V: 88
Christianitas: defense of, V: 118;
    disintegration of, IV: 34-35, 49, 85,
    88; as mystical body of Christ,
    IV: 117; and preservation of society,
    V: 121-23; Salutati on, IV: 40;
    sovereignty of, V: 113-14; as Western
    civilization, VI: 34
Christianity: absolute order of, II: 165-
    66; and American Indians, V: 123,
    126-27; and amor Dei, IV: 64; and
    apolitism, IV: 132-34; and Arabic-
    Aristotelian intellectualism, IV: 136,
    139; and Aristotelianism, II: 80,
    81, 178-79, 185, 189n14, 195-
    97n; and asceticism, IV: 100, 142; and
    astrology, V: 149-55; and Augustinian
    view of history, VI: 40; authority of
    church and Christian symbols from
    1700 to present, VI: 54-60, 71; and
    Bakunin, VIII: 253-55, 264; and
    Baptism, I: 170; Bodin on, V: 214; in
    Bohemia, III: 202; and Bossuet, VI: 36-
    37, 46-51; breakdown of Western
    Christianity, VI: 149; and Caesarean
    Christianity, II: 157-59; Calvin's
    universalism, V: 5, 19, 20, 108-10;
    central mystery of, VIII: 27-28; and
    Charlemagne, II: 37; church-state
    relations, I: 151; IV: 116-19, 119n,
    125; VI: 53-54; civilizing work of
    church in Middle Ages, VI: 52, 125; and
    community, I: 30-32, 94, 150-
    51, 155-61, 165-74; in Comte's
    Calendrier, VIII: 196, 201; conflict
    with Jewish-Christian community,
    I: 174-75, 174n; and consciousness
    of epoch, I: 149-51; continuity
    of Christian with intramundane
    problems, VI: 44-51; and conversion,
    VIII: 146; conversion of Clovis to,
    III: 58; Coptic Christianity, I: 177;
    corruption and disintegration of,
    I: 30-40; III: 182-84; IV: 68; crisis of,
    VII: 285-86; d'Alembert on, VIII: 94-
    96; and Descent of the Spirit,
    I: 30-32, 165-66; differentiation
    between government and, II: 3;
    disciplinarian schisms in Western
    Church, I: 208-9; and earth, VIII: 141;
    Eastern Christianity, II: 165-66; and
    emperors, I: 207-8; of Erasmus,
    IV: 7, 90-97, 98; Erasmus on ascetic
    prince, IV: 7-8, 91-92, 97-109, 116;
    and eschatological hardness of
    Jesus, I: 158-59; and eschatological
    hardness of the believers, I: 160-
    61; and eschatology, VII: 229-30; ethics
    of, IV: 141; evil as viewed
    by, VIII: 279; and faith, I: 31, 33, 36,
    39-40, 167-68; faith and reason,
    0: 182, 183-84, 187, 188-90; Fall
    and corruption of human nature,
    VIII: 279; first duty of Christian,
    IV: 114; Franciscan Christianity,
    II: 141-42; and freedom, IV: 68-
    69, 252-58, 266; French types
    of, VII: 270-71; and Germanic
    tribes, II: 32; Gnostic distortion
    of, VIII: 32-23, 22-23n, 27, 29;
    and God's love for humans, I: 36;
    Gospel of John as Summa of
    creed, I: 180; and governmental
    authority ordained by God, I: 172,
    172n, 202, 203; and Hellenistic
    pneumatics, I: 175; Helv‚tius on,
    VIII: 54; historical literalism of,
    III: 110; and historicity of symbols,
    IV: 223-2 8, 285-91; history of
    generally, V: 233; ideal of human
    existence, II: 191; and imperial
    authority, I: 204-5; and increase in
    unbelief, IV: 91; and indifference
    to social problems, I: 158, 171-72;
    individualism versus community,
    I: 32-33; and intellectualism, II: 208-
    11; intramundane forces as analogue
    to, VI: 41-42; intramundane sacred
    history, VI: 42-43; and Israelitic
    law, I: 113; and Jesus, I: 151-63;
    Johannine Christianity, I: 179-82; and
    just war, V: 117-21, 125, 127,
    128; Kierkegaard on, VII: 203; and
    Kingdom of Heaven, I: 156-62, 166-
    67, 169, 201, 207; II: 37; Locke on,
    VI: 76, 172-81; loss of Christian
    meaning of history, VIII: 112-13; and
    love, I: 171, 202; III: 178-79, 181-83;
    VIII: 27-128; and Machiavelli, IV: 68-
    69, 70, 84, 86; and Magian Nations,
    I: 182-85; and Maistre, VIII: 221-
    23; and Marcionite movement,
    I: 181; Marsilius of Padua on, III: 97-
    101, 98n, 105; Marx on, VII: 203,
    238, 239; VIII: 61, 340-42, 342n38,
    346-47, 358n68; Melanchthon on,
    V: 151-52; and mendicant orders,
    II: 78-81; minimum dogma of,
    IV: 117; missionary activity of,
    VII: 167; and monasteries, II: 11,
    63-64; Monophysite Christology,
    II: 53, 54; Montanism, I: 181-82; of
    More, IV: 48, 116-19; national,
    civilizational, and dogmatic patterns
    in, I: 176-77; and national cores,
    I: 176-79; and Neoplatonism, VI: 106;
    Nietzsche on, VII: 203, 270-71, 288-
    90; and order, III: 12-13; orthodoxy
    and heresy in, I: 75-76; overview on,
    VIII: 27-31; "parochial Christianity, "
    III: 15, 168-75, 192; and Pascal,
    VII: 254, 255-56, 270-71, 271n52,
    285-87, 289; and Paul, I: 166-75;
    persecutions of Christians, I: 184-85,
    207, 208; and philosophy, IV: 7,
    92-93, 98-99; and Piers Plowman,
    III: 178-84; and pneuma of Christ,
    VI: 6, 62; pneumatocentric attitude
    of, V: 169, 173, 176; and poor and rich,
    I: 156-61; potentialities for unfolding
    of, IV: 142; and poverty, II: 137-38,
    139, 178, 180, 198-203; IV: 144-45;
    and pre-Reformation, III: 172-75;
    priesthood of every Christian,
    I: 32-33; proselytizing character of,
    I: 178; rearticulation of Christian
    era, VI: 31-34; reformations of,
    I: 162; regional spiritual movements,
    III: 171-75; relation between perfect
    Christianity and free thought,
    VII: 270, 271n52; and representation,
    III: 152-53; return to healthy
    beginnings of, IV: 69; Roman
    Christianity, IV: 223; and sacrum
    imperium,
I: 31-32, 33, 38, 186;
    Savonarola's defense of, V: 150-51;
    Schelling on, VII: 203, 211, 219-
    20, 222, 230-33, 236-39; VIII: 256;
    schisms in, II: 98-99, 100; and
    secularization dynamics, VI: 51-
    57; spiritualism of, IV: 134; and
    spiritual realists, I: 24-25; Stoicism
    compared with, I: 99, 200, 201-2;
    subjection, obedience, and social
    order, I: 70-71; Swift on, VI: 182-83;
    Syrian-Egyptian-Greek Christianity,
    I: 176; Third Christianity, VII: 230-
    33, 237; Thomas Aquinas on
    community of free Christians,
    II: 218-20; Toland on, VI: 179-83;
    toleration of, I: 149, 207; of Tolstoy,
    VIII: 280-82; transformation of, in
    classical territory, I: 183-84; and
    transubstantiation, IV: 224-28, 242-
    43; Turgot on, VIII: 147; universalist
    idea of Paul and assertion of ethnic
    differences, I: 173-74; values of,
    IV: 68-70; Vico on, VI: 88-89, 99-101,
    106, 109-11, 115, 118, 131; and
    view of history, IV: 41-42, 85, 141;
    V: 136, 233; VII: 245; VIII: 29-30,
    29-30n34; and visions of Resurrected
    Jesus, I: 163-66; Vitoria's association
    of humankind with, V: 1 16-17;
    Voegelin's call for new Christian
    philosophy of history, VIII: 29-30,
    29-30n34; Voegelin's relationship to,
    I: 24-25, 24n, 53; Voltaire's attack
    on, VI: 9,10, 21, 57-71; Warburton's
    political sermons, VI: 156-61; and
    Western philosopher, II: 187; of
    William of Ockham, III: 108-9;
    and Wycliffe, III: 13, 168-70, 172-
    75, 184-92; and Yahwism, I: 115.
    See also Augustine, Saint; Bible;
    Catholic Church; Church; Corpus
    mysticum; God; Gospels; Heresies;
    Jesus Christ; Mysticism; Popes;
    Protestantism; Reformation; Saints;
    Spiritual movements; Thomas
    Aquinas; Trinity
Christianity Not Mysterious (Toland),
    VI: 76, 179-83
Christian Letter of certaine English
    Protestants,
V: 80-81n, 93-94
Christian theory of law, I: 200-205,201n5
Christianum imperium, III: 205
Christological heresies, I: 178-79,208
Christus in terris (Christ on earth), IV: 207-208
Chronica (Eusebius), I: 221
Chronica (Matthew of Paris), IV: 44
Chronica Parmensia (Fra Salimbene), IV: 44
Chronicon Moissiancense (Chronicle of
    Moissac), II: 58,59
Chrysippus, I: 95
Chrysostom, VI: 46
Church: and Aristotelianism, II: 179;
   Augustine on, II: 138; and Babylonian
   Captivity, III: 163,164; Calvin
   on true church, IV: 278-83; and
   Capitualry of 802, II: 60-61; Christ
   as head of invisible church, III: 188;
   clash between nations and, III: 40-
   42; and Clericis Laicos, III: 43,
   44; comprensiveness of, IV: 142;
   compromises of, IV: 140-42; and
   Conciliar movement, III: 12, 24,
   41-42, 113,125, 245-66; IV: 35;
   conflict between sects and, IV: 140-
    43; consequences of attack on,
    IV: 143; as corpus diaboli, II: 100;
    corruption of, III: 182-84; Curia
    in, III: 166-67, 168, 209; discipline
    of, VII: 145; and disintegration
    of Christianitas, IV: 34-35; as
    divine-human organization, IV: 141;
    and Donation of Constantine,
    III: 57; ecclesiastical hierarchy,
    II: 200-203, 204; and ecclesiastical
    totalitarianism, III: 52-53; and
    episcopal authority, II: 203; Erasmus
    on, IV: 98; excommunication from,
    VII: 127, 145; in France, III: 253-55,
    256; Francis of Assisi on, II: 138-49; in
    Germany, III: 198, 256; IV: 233; and
    Golden Bull, III: 198, 203-16,
    228; and Great Schism, III: 41,
    163, 188, 191, 192, 245-53; Greek
    Church, III: 250; Hobbes on, VII: 69,
    70; Hooker's types of ecclesiastical
    organization, V: 86; and Hussite
    question, III: 41-42; and Index
    Prohibitorum Librorum,
III: 112; and
    indulgences, IV: 229-31, 242,
    245; infallibility of, III: 111, 124-25,
    247; and Investiture Struggle, III: 15,
    40, 66, 79, 92, 103, 116, 193; and
    Jubilee of 1450, III: 42; and Leipzig
    Disputation, IV: 16, 220-23, 224, 231;
    Locke on, VII: 142; Luther on reforms
    needed in, IV: 240-44; Marsilius
    of Padua on, III: 97-101, 98n, 105;
    Milton on, VII: 93-95; minimum
    dogma for state religion, VII: 134-3 5;
    monarchical government for, III: 252,
    258; and nationalism, III: 40-42, 255-
    56; Nicholas of Cusa on government
    of, III: 263-66; Pomonazzion, IV: 98; as
    power organization, III: 41;
    and pre- Reformation, III: 172-
    75; privatization of, VII: 142-44;
    reform and anticivilizational effects,
    IV: 143-45; regional spiritual
    movements, III: 171-75; and
    representation, III: 152-53; and
    Rienzo, III: 235, 237, 241, 243; and
    Roman law, II: 167; sacraments of,
    IV: 140, 141, 143, 159, 274, 275,
    277, 278; Schelling on, VII: 225-27;
    schism between Greek Church
    and Latin Church, IV: 16, 220-24,
    279-80n35; secular civilization
    and withdrawal of, III: 109-12;
    separation of church and state,
    IV: 117, 119n; V: 21, 47; and spiritual
    hierarchy, II: 200-203, 204; state
    as, VIII: 207-9; temporal power of,
    III: 11-12, 120-21, 187-88, 248, 253;
    territorial church, II: 60-61; Thomas
    Aquinas on, II: 212; transformation
    of organization of, III: 164-67; and
    transubstantiation, IV: 223-28,
    242-43; and Unam Sanctam, III: 43-
    46, 47; and Universal Inquisition,
    III: 112; and varietas religionum,
    II: 128; William of Ockham on,
    III: 120-21; and Wycliffe, III: 13, 168-
    70, 172-75, 184-92. See also Catholic
    Church; Christianity; Church of
    England; Corpus mysticum; Popes;
    Protestantism; Reformation; and
    specific churches
Churchill, Winston, VIII: 227n74
Church Militant, III: 188
Church of England: and Act of
    Supremacy of 1534, V: 20-21; and
    Anglican schism, VI: 10,
    52; authority of, III: 255; VII: 77; in
    commonwealth, V: 74-90;
    establishment of, III: 129, 130;
    Hooker on, V: 98; and independence
    from papacy, III: 167-68; intellectual
    and spiritual functioning of,
    VI: 153-56; Luther on, IV: 233;
    nationalization of, III: 168; VI: 75; and
    Puritanism, VI: 10, 163; royal
    supremacy of, V: 27, 40
Church of Jerusalem, I: 175
Church of Lyons, I: 177
Church reform: and Cardinal Humbert,
    II: 91-94; and Crusades, II: 72-
    73; and growth of evocation,
    II: 65-68; mendicant orders,
    II: 77-81; military orders, II: 73-
    77; monastic reform, II: 68-72; spirit
    militant, II: 72-81; Tractatus
    Eboracenses, II: 95-101. See also
    Counter-Reformation; Investiture
    Controversy; Reformation
Church-state, Constitutiones
    Egidianae
of, IV: 39
Church-state relations, I: 151; IV: 116-
    19, 119n, 125; VI: 53-54; VII: 223-24
Cicero: Augustine's critique of, I: 217-
    19; Bodin compared with, V: 221n65,
    222; on Caesar, I: 133, 140; Calvinist
    view of, V: 57; clarity of, I: 131; as
    common intelligence of humankind,
    I: 131; on consent as basis of civil
    society, VII: 140; death of, I: 138;
    definitions of the people and the
    republic by, I: 217-18; V: 43; and
    Grotius, VII: 53, 57; hieroglyphic
    character of works of, I: 52, 131-
    32, 134, 136-37; identification of
    Roman order and world order, I: 197,
    199; and imperium Romanum,
    I: 150; influence of, on trend toward
    deification of positive order, I: 202; and
    myth of government, I: 136; and
    myth of law, I: 136-37, 219; II: 163;
    narrowness and conservatism of,
    I: 132-33; on officia (duties), I: 99; and
    Panaetius, I: 133-35; and Plato,
    I: 131-32, 133; and Polybius, I: 133; on
    Rome, I: 132-38, 140, 145; II: 164; as
    Stoic, I: 133, 191, 199; II: 119;
    Voegelin's reasons for including,
    I: 53; on wise human, I: 134
—Work
    s: Laws, I: 131-32; Republic,
    I: 131-32, 134, 135, 137
Cimbri, II: 30
Ciompi, II: 221; III: 231; IV: 40-41
Cistercian reform and Cistercian
    monasteries, II: 70-71, 73, 133-34; III:
    66, 171
Citeaux, II: 70-71
Citoyens, VIII: 236
Città, IV: 210
Città corrotta, IV: 59, 86
City of the Sun (Campanella), IV: 112
City-states: area of, III: 216-18; Burgundy,
    III: 223-24; constitution
    of Venice, III: 232-33; feudal world
    and towns, III: 218-19; and Fourth
    Crusade, III: 221-22; in Germany,
    III: 216-19, 224-28; and Hansa,
    III: 224-27; internal structure
    of towns, III: 229-32; in Italy,
    III: 10, 154, 217-18, 220-23, 228,
    230-33; organization of Venetian
    conquest, III: 222-23; Southwest
    German leagues, III: 227-28; Swiss
    Confederation, III: 228-29; trade
    routes and food supply, III: 220-21
Cives Romani, II: 170
Civil discipline, V: 193-94
Civil disobedience, VIII: 282-83
Civil Dominion (Wycliffe), III: 185,
    186-88
Civil government. See Government
Civilization: Condorcet on destruction
    of historical civilization, VIII: 155-
    57, 203, 362; cycles of, V: 23;
    disintegration of, I: 40; epochs of,
    V: 144-46; Gobineau on, VIII: 126; Le
    Roy's optimism on, V: 144; Rousseau
    on, VIII: 130; Seneca's critique of,
    I: 199-200; superiority of, V: 127-18;
    Toynbee on "creative minority" and,
    VIII: 131; Toynbee on destruction of,
    VIII: 94, 127
Civil law, V: 148
Civil lordship, IV: 77-78
Civil state. See State
Civil wars: deaths in, VII: 65-66; VIII: 82; in
    England, III: 141, IV: 151;
    VII: 73, 84-85, 101, 106, 139; in
    France, VI: 84; in Rome, I: 188; in
    United States, VII: 90
Civitas (civil community): Erasmus
    on, IV: 100, 106; fatality of, I: 217;
    Marsilius on, III: 86, 87, 93, 95-97;
    political form of, V: 224; Siger de
    Brabant on, II: 194; Thomas Aquinas
    on, II: 13, 215, 218, 220; types in,
    V: 58
Civitas De I: Augustine on, I: 79, 134-
    35, 213-16; II: 114n, 115n3; IV: 43,
    110; Bodin on, V: 202; Dante on,
    III: 81; Hearnshaw's interpretation of,
    I: 214n; Hooker on, V: 83, 84; Luther
    on, IV: 263-65, 272; Machiavelli on,
    IV: 85; More on, IV: 120; Pauline
    idea of, I: 213-16; peace for, I: 219; and
    politics, I: 207; symbolism of,
    I: 209-10
Civitas Dei (Augustine), VI: 35, 110,
    111
Civitas diaboli (city of the devil), I: 213;
    II: 93
Civitas perfecta, II: 25
Civitas terrena, I: 79, 209, 214, 218,
    219; II: 114; IV: 263, 264
Civitates (several polities), II: 166;
    III: 226; V: 68, 224
Civium universitas, III: 89
Clairvaux, II: 71
Clarendon Code, VI: 153
Clarisses, IV: 149
Clarke, Samuel, VI: 58, 66, 193, 202-5,
    202n74, 205n, 212, 213, 213n
Class structure, II: 192; VIII: 233, 256-
    57, 259. See also Bourgeoisie; Middle
    class; Poverty; Proletariat; Workers
Class struggle: d'Alembert on, VIII: 97-
    98; and greatest-happiness principle,
    VIII: 75; Helvétius on, VIII: 77-79;
    Marx on, VIII: 305-6, 313n7
Class Struggles in France (Engels),
    VIII: 313
Claude, M., VI: 49-51
Claudian house of emperors, I: 186
Claudius, I: 191
Claudius II Gothicus, I: 186
Clausula rebus sic stantibus. VIII: 77
Cleanthes, I: 95
Cleisthenes, I: 135
Clemens, III: 235, 235n
Clemens Alexandrinus, I: 236
Clement, Jacques, V: 40n
Clement, Third Epistle of, II: 203
Clement IV, Pope, III: 60
Clement V, Pope, III: 164, 253
Clement VI, Pope, III: 165, 167, 185,
    235
Clement VII, Pope, III: 245
Clementine decrees, IV: 185
Clement of Alexandria, IV: 272
Cleopatra, I: 92, 141-43, 221
Cleopatra Selene, I: 142
Cleph, II: 47
Clericis Laicos, III: 43, 44, 138-39
Clientes, VI: 138
Climates, theory of, V: 229-31, 241-42;
    VII: 169
Closure, V: 74; VI: 12, 78-81
Clotsworthy, VII: 109
Cloud of Unknowing, III: 177
Clovis, II: 33, 56; III: 58
Cluny and Cluniac reforms, II: 68-71,
    73, 81, 105; III: 152, 171, 196, 197;
    IV: 149
Codex Justinianus, I: 236; III: 149
Coelestium siderum legibus soluti,
    V: 213
Cogitare (thinking about), VI: 96-97,
    107, 145
Cogitationes, VI: 98
Cogito, VI: 99, 107-8
Cogito ergo sum, VI: 145
Cognitio fidei, VI: 59, 71, 182; VII: 186;
    VIII: 301
Cognitio historia, V: 225
Cognitio historiarum, V: 225
Coincidentia oppositorum, VIII: 369
Coke, Sir Edward, VII: 76
Coker, Francis W., I: 6
Cola di Rienzo. See Rienzo, Cola di
Cole, G. D. H., III: 143
"Collaborator" argument, IV: 115-16
Collective existence of humankind,
    II: 191-93, 194
Collectivism, I: 37
Collegio, collegium, III: 215, 233
Collier, Thomas, IV: 165-67, 168
Collingwood, R. G., VI: 132n
Colloquium Heptaplomeres (Bodin),
    I: 35; II: 80; V: 23, 181, 184, 185,
    187, 196, 205-18, 222, 238, 239-40;
    VII: 193
Colonies: in America, VII: 80, 86-
    89, 91-92, 103, 109, 141-42,
    144; German colonization of the
    East, III: 199-203; independence of,
    VIII: 156. See also Imperialism
Colonna, Cardinal, III: 38
Comble de tous erreurs, V: 202
Comets, V: 163, 164-65, 165n76
Commentaries (Averroës), II: 179-82
Commentary (Alexander of Aphro-
    disias), II: 184
Commentary (Peter Lombard), III: 176
Commentary on the Gospel of Saint
    John
(Erigena), IV: 154
Commodus, I: 191-92, 193
Common intelligence (koine epinoia),
    I: 129-31
Common law, III: 130; VII: 76
Common man. See Human nature
Commonwealth: Christian common-
    wealth, V: 80-88; VII: 69-70; as civil
    state, VII: 69; and control of opinion,
    VII: 70; definition of, II: 121-22;
    Diggers' idea of Christian communist
    commonwealth, VII: 97-100; of
    England, V: 74-78; Harrington on,
    VII: 100-1O3; Hobbes on, VII: 67-72;
    Hooker's Christian commonwealth,
    V: 80-88; John of Salisbury on, II: 158,
    212; legal closure of, VII: 68-69; Locke
    on, VII: 142; More on, IV: 123-
    24; spiritual closure of, VII: 69-70,
    77
Commune consilium regni, II: 120;
    III: 152
Communes, III: 136, 218, 230-35
Communicatio (communion), V: 57
Communism: antispiritualism of,
    VIII: 139-40; appeal of, to masses,
    VII: 144; and Bakunin, VIII: 266-67;
    and belief of science, VI: 184, 209;
    collapse of, VIII: 15; and earlier
    sectarian movements, VI: 32; and
    elites, VIII: 132, 134; eschatological
    speculation of, IV: 178; historical
    perspective of, VIII: 361-62; Hooker
    on, V: 98; and industrial system,
    VIII: 133-34; and Lenin, III: 72;
    VIII: 312- 16; and Marxist movement
    generally, I: 157-58; V: 111; Marx
    on crude communism and true
    communism, VIII: 359-61, 371;
    Marx on goal of, VIII: 14-15; and
    Marx's Communist Manifesto,
    IV: 245; VIII: 216, 303, 310, 312n7,
    361-66; in mid-twentieth century,
    II: 198n; and miscarriage of plan,
    IV: 156, 17S; and More, IV: 9, 125; and
    Moscow trials, V: 77; and nationalist
    social movements, II: 76-77; and
    National Socialism, I: 160, 210;
    II: 198n; IV: 175; V: 132; VI: 32; origins
    of, I: 115, 160; and planning, VII: 188;
    pyramid structure of, VIII: 289-90;
    and Russian idea of corruption of
    the West, IV: 279n35; and Russian
    imperialism, VIII: 319; and Spengler's
    philosophy, VI: 120; and Syllabus
    Errorum of 1864,
III: 110; systems of,
    I: 20; and Third Realm, VII: 241; and
    Third Realm of ideas, I: 210; II: 132;
    tribalism of, VIII: 117; ultimate aims
    of, VIII: 364-65; Utopia's influence
    on, IV: 130, 135; Vico on, VI: 146;
comm(voltaire)to Discours sur l'ensemble(Comte)
    Voltaire compared to, VI: 63; in
    Western countries, VIII: 287-88. See
    also
Proletariat
Communis opinio,
II: 169
Communist Manifesto (Marx), IV: 245;
    VIII: 216, 303, 310, 312n7, 361-66
Communitas (community), III: 213;
    V: 67
Communitas civitatis, III: 148
Communitas comitatus, III: 148
Communitas communitatum, V: 113
Communitas perfecta, II: 218; III: 56,
    86, 87
Community: and Christianity, I: 30-
    32, 94, 150-51, 155-61, 165-
    72; as Christ's body and spirit,
    I: 155, 170-71; and "civilizational
    disintegration, " I: 40; consciousness
    of, III: 21-25; and corpus mysticum,
    I: 30-32, 38; and Descent of the
    Spirit, I: 165-66; Grotius on desire
    for, VII: 57-58; Hobbes on, VII: 65; idea of,
    VII: 12-13; individualism
    versus, I: 32-33; and Israel, I: 113,
    114, 116; papal power versus, I: 37-
    39; Paul on Christian community,
    I: 167-68, 170-71; poor and rich in
    Christian community, I: 156-61; and
    Stoicism, I: 99-100; of women,
    I: 96, 236. See also Civitas (civil
    community); Ecclesia (community)
Commynes, Philippe de, IV: 34
Compacta of 1433, III: 42
Compagnies d'Ordonnance, III: 224
Campañia (military band or cohort),
    V: 61
Compass, V: 146n16
Compassion, VI: 8, 62-64, 68-70, 72
"Compromise with the world," II: 9, 14
Comte, Auguste: and abolition
    of Christ, VIII: 201-2; and
    anti-intellectualism and an-
    tiphilosophism, IV: 237, 238-39; and
    antireligious ideology, VI: 51, 75; and
    Apocalypse of Man, VIII: 184-
    85, 343; and Bakunin, VIII: 12,
    297; on beginning of "provisional"
    positivist era, VIII: 195-96; Bodin
    on, V: 236; compared to Calvin,
    IV: 291; compared with Marx,
    VIII: 13-14, 185, 230, 258, 359, 368;
    concluding comments on, VIII: 245-
    50; continuity in life of, VIII: 174-85;
    creation of new elites by, VIII: 132;
    d'Alembert's influence on, VIII: 89;
    death of, VIII: 178, 184; "decisive"
    proclamation of, VIII: 168-69; and
    divinization of woman, VIII: 189-
    91; Dumas on, VIII: 167-69, 170;
    education of, VIII: 175; and end of
    amicitia, I: 36; and Engels, VIII: 335;
    eschatological speculation of, IV: 17 8; VII:
    7; on fiction of Christ, VIII: 196-
    98; financial situation of, VIII: 183; and
    French Revolution, VIII: 195-
    211; and Global Republic, VIII: 179; as
    Gnostic, VIII: 236-41, 368; on
    governants (rulers) and gouvernés
    (ruled), VIII: 236; on Grand-Être,
    VIII: 10, 96, 113, 184-85, 196-99,
    214; and harmonization of heart
    and intellect, VIII: 186-87, 248; on
    historicity of mind, VIII: 191-92; on
    history, VIII: 236-41; hygiène
    cérébrale
of, VIII: 176, 180, 180n23,
    194; intellectual autobiography
    by, VIII: 175-77; on intervention
    and social regeneration, VIII: 180-
    81; introductory comments on,
    VIII: 7-11, 29, 161-63; intuition of,
    VIII: 193-94, 234-45; and laws of
    three phases, VI: 43-45, 104n12; and
    Littre, VIII: 165-74, 193, 215,
    248-49; on meditation and personal
    renovation, VIII: 176, 179-80, 181,
    343; and memory of Grand-Être,
    IV: 47n13; mental disturbance
    of, VIII: 164-69; mental unity of,
    VIII: 176, 185-94; messianism of,
    VIII: 168-71, 195-96, 241-45, 247;
    Mill on, VIII: 163-64, 170, 180,
    215; and modern science, VI: 184;
    and monadic closure, VIII: 192-94,
    215; monumentalization of private
    life of, VIII: 182-84; and murder
    of God, VIII: 202; on Napoleon,
    VIII: 169, 204-6; and Occidental
    Republic, VIII: 164-65, 178, 179,
    185, 195, 202-6, 221-22, 227-28;
    "operation" of, VIII: 194, 210; and
    perfecti of enlightenment, IV: 213;
    phases of work of, VIII: 177-79; on
    political intellectuals, VIII: 234-
    36; as political thinker, IV: 125;
    Positivism of, VIII: 88, 108, 134, 139,
    165, 186, 297, 307; and pragmatism,
    VI: 209; on progress, VIII: 131, 136-
    37; and Protestant elect, IV: 15; as
    publicist, VIII: 234-36; relation
    with Clotilde de Vaux, VIII: 163,
    174, 182, 184, 187-91, 195; on
    Religion of Humanity, VIII: 10, 163,
    166-67, 185, 193, 194-210, 216,
    221-22, 248-49; and restratification
    of society, VI: 212-13; and Saint-
    Simon, VIII: 175, 206-7, 216, 228-33;
    scientism of, VIII: 142, 238-39, 242,
    243-45, 248, 251; as secularist,
    IV: 194, 201; significance of, VI: 150;
    VIII: 108; spiritual impotence of,
    VIII: 199-200; split in life of,
    VIII: 163-74; style of explication
    of, VIII: 181-82; theory subtypes,
    II: 130; on three phases of history,
    VII1: 7, 11, 104, 108-9, 136-37, 175,
    244-50; and Turgot, VIII: 11, 104,
    107-9, 119, !20; utilitarianism of,
    VIII: 98, 192-93; Vico on, VI: 108,
    147; Voegelin on generally, I: 45;
    and Western crisis, VIII: 161-63;
    will of, VIII: 184; and will to power,
    VIII: 200-202
—Works:
    Appel au conservateurs,
    VIII: 178; Appel au public occidental,
    VIII: 178; "A sa majesté le tzar
    Nicolas," VIII: 179; "A son
    excellence Reschid-Pascha, "
    VIII: 179; Calendrier positiviste,
    VIII: 178, 178n20, 196, 201;
    Catéchisme positiviste, VIII: 178;
    "Considérations philosophiques
   sur les sciences et les savants,"
    VIII: 178; "Considérations sur
    le pouvoir spirituel, " VIII: 178;
    Cours de philosophie positive,
    VIII: 163, 170, 175-81, 195, 199-
    200, 229; Discours préliminaire,
    VIII: 186-87, 191-92; Discours
    sur 1'ensemble du positivisme,

    VIII: 178; "Essor empirique du
    républicanisme français, " VIII: 164-
    65; Le fondateur de la Société
    positiviste, à quiconque désire s'y
    incorporer,
VIII: 178; Philosophie
    politique
, VIII: 177; "Plan des
    travaux scientifiques nécessaires pour
    réorganiser la société, " VIII: 177-
    78, 241-45; "Préface personelle, "
    VIII: 175, 180, 181; Prières, VIII: 188-
    90; "Séparation générale entre les
    opinions et les désirs, " VIII: 234-
    36; "Sommaire appréciation de
    1'ensemble du passé moderne, "
    VIII: 237-41; Synthèse subjective,
    VIII: 178-79, 178n21, 192; Système
    de logique positive,
VIII: 178; Système de
    politique positive,

    VIII: 163, 177-78, 183, 186, 195,
    196n37, 197-99, 206, 216
Comte, Charles, VIII: 216-18
Comuneros, IV: 108
Conantur, VI: 108
Conatus (Vico), VI: 104-6, 105n13, 108
"Conceit of scholars, " VI: 16-17
Concentration camps, IV: 180; VII: 192
Conciliar movement: and Concor-
    dantia Catholica,
III: 256-66; and
    concordats, III: 255-56; and Conrad of
    Gelnhausen, III: 246-47; and decree
    Frequens, III: 247-48, 250; forerunner
    of, II: 203; III: 113, 125; and French
    National Council of 1398, III: 252-54; and
    French National Council of 1406,
    III: 254-55; and Gallicanism, III: 252-
    56; and Great Schism, III: 245-53; and
    Henry of Langenstein, III: 246; impact
    of, III: 12; and national concordats,
    III: 252-56; and Nicholas of Cusa,
    III: 24, 251-52, 256-66; IV: 35;
    nominalism and jurisdictionalism
    in, III: 248-52; purposes of, III: 41-42;
    IV: 35
Concives (fellow citizens), III: 149
Concordantia (spiritual harmony),
    III: 17, 24-25, 257, 258, 263-66
Concordantia Catholica (Nicholas of
    Cusa), III: 24, 252n, 256-66
Concordantia discordantium
    canonum
(Gratian), II: 172
Concordantia infinita, III: 265-66
Concordantissima unio , III: 258, 266
Concordat of Genzano, III: 256
Concordat of Vienna, III: 251, 256
Concordat of Worms, II: 68, 91, 105,
    108; III: 206
Concordats, III: 252-56; IV: 137
Concordats of Constance, III: 256
Concordia, I: 94; III: 215
Concordia novi ac veteris testamenti,
    II: 131
Concordi comunione (common
    possession), I: 218
Concorditer, III: 211
"Concrete man, " VIII: 113-14
Condé, Prince de, VII: 106, 119
Condillac, Etienne Bonnot de, VI: 150;
    VIII: 48, 68
Conditio humana (human condition),
    IV: 79-81; VIII: 307. See also Human
    nature
Condorcet, Marquis de: on burning
    documents, VIII: 151n64; and
    Comte, VIII: 175, 195, 216, 238; on
    contemplation and elysium,
    VIII: 160; on destruction of historical
    civilization, VIII: 155-57, 203,
    362; on directing the destiny
    of humankind, VIII: 153-54; on
    intellectuals and propagating the
    faith, VIII: 149-53, 235; personality
    of, IV: 268; on printing, VIII: 151-52,
    152n65; on progress, VIII: 153-55,
    194; on social reforms, VIII: 157-
    58; on Superman, IV: 187, 194; VI:
    209; VIII: 158-59; utilitarianism
    of, VIII: 231
—Work
    : Esquisse, VIII: 8, 8n, 148-61,
Condottieri, IV: 38
Confession (Bakunin), VIII: 259-76
Confession du Pêcheur (Pascal),
    VII: 256, 286
Confessions (Augustine), I: 206, 207;
    VI: 213n
Conflictus, VI: 201
Confucianism and Confucius, IV: 101,
    134; VI: 50; VIII: 196
Congregatio (life of group), V: 67
Congregational societies, IV: 169
Congress of Vienna of 1815, VIII: 219
Coningsby (Disraeli), III: 142
Conjurationes, III: 218
Connaissances humaines (human
    knowledge), VIÉÉ:89, 90
Connecticut settlement, VII: 87-88,
    109
Conrad, Joseph, IV: 112
Conrad of Gelnhausen, III: 246-47,
    247n5
Conregnans, II: 99
Conring, Hermann, V: 187
Conscience: Grotius on, VII: 58; Kant
    on, IV: 26o; VII: 93; Milton on, VII: 93;
    Nietzsche on cruelty of, VII: 276-77,
    295; Williams on liberty of, VII: 91
    Consciousness: Bruno on ecstasy of
    speculation, V: 173; community
    consciousness, III: 21-25; definition    
    of, V: 72- 73; epochal consciousness,   
    I: 149-5I, 168-70, 210-13, 220;   
    VI. 31-34
Consciousness-reality, I: 43-45
Consensu iuris (consent to right order),
    I: 217-18
Consensus in idem, pactum et
    stipulatio,
V: 43
Consent theory, V: 101, 103, 105;
    VII: 149-50
Considerata quantitate, III: 90
"Considérations philosophiques sur
    les sciences et les savants" (Comte),
    VIII: 178
Considérations sur la France (Maistre),
    VIII: 220, 221
"Considérations sur le pouvoir
    spirituel" (Comte), VIII: 178
Consilium (baronial parliament),
    III: 136, 140, 152
Consilium Pacis (Henry of Langen-
    stein), III: 246, 247n3
Consistorium, III: 235
Consociatio (organized social life),
    V: 57; VII: 49
Consociatio privata, V: 58
Consociatio publica , V: 58
Consociation, V: 57-58
Consorterie, III: 231
Conspectu Dei , I: 206; V: 191, 240-41
Conspiracies, III: 214; IV: 60, 64, 127
Conspiratio divitum (conspiracy of the
    rich), IV: 123
Constance, concordats of, III: 256
Constance, Council of, III: 41, 248-50,
    255; IV: 222
Constance, peace of, III: 197
Constance of Sicily, II: 145, 147
Constans II, II: 54
Constant, Benjamin, VII: 118; VIII: 212-
    13, 225
Constantia in Deo, VI: 94
Constantine, Emperor, 1:178, 198,
    207-8; II: 6, 11, 56, 60, 188n;
    III: 236; VIII: 313n7
Constantine Donation, III: 57, 191
Constantinople: and Catherine of
    Valois, III: 222; church's role in,
    IV: 224; crusade to, III: 221; fall of,
    III: 39, 40; IV: 44, 243; V: 112, 141;
    VIII: 101; as seat of government,
    I: 186; threat to, I: 183
Constantius II, I: 208; II: 5 6
Constitutio Lotharii, II: 82n
Constitutionalism: and Agreement
    of the People in England,
VII: 81-
    83; in American colonies, VII: 103,
    141-42; Cicero on constitution
    of Rome, I: 135; and community
    consciousness, III: 21-25; constitu-
    tional monarchy, V: 40; VII: 84; and
    contract theory, I: 110; and Council of
    Constance, III: 248-49; definition of,
    III: 141, 141n; development of, III: 19;
    IV: 2, 32-33; in England, III: 22, 23-24,
    128, 129, 134, 141-45, 149; VI: 156;
    VII: 24, 51, 81-83, 168; in Germany,
    III: 83-84; Harrington on, VII: 102-3;
    and hierarchy of powers, II: 222; III:
    46; medieval world as forerunner
    of, III: 6, 21; Nicholas of Cusa on,
    III: 24-25, 265; philosophic-Christian
    synthesis and, III: 19-20, 21, 41,
    56; and representation, III: 22-23;
    Schelling on constitution making,
    VI: 145; sources of, III: 20; Spinoza
    on, VII: 135; as symbol, III: 22,
    144-46; Thomas Aquinas on, II: 220-
    23, 229; and tripolity of Polybius,
    I: 127, 129; U. S. Constitution, I: 129;
    V: 24; VII: 82; Venetian constitution,
    III: 232-33; Voegelin's analysis of
    process of, III: 21-22; Warburton on,
    VI: 160-6l, 172
Constitution Deo auctore (De
    conceptione digestorum),
II: 165-
    66
Constitutions Egidianae, IV: 39
Constitutions and Canons of 1604,
    VII: 77
Constitutions of Melfi (Frederick II),
    II: 12, 13, 148, 151-57, 173; III: 205
Constitutio omnem, II: 164
Constitutio tanta (De conformatione
    digestorum),
II: 165-66
Consubstantiation, IV: 181, 226
Consulate of the Sea, V: 113
Contarini, Carlo, V: 247n102; VI: 83
Contemplatio, V: 235n75
Contemplation, V: 193-95, 240-41,
    250; VII: 20
Contemplative life (vita contempla-
    tiva),
III: 176; IV: 71, 268; VII: 32-33,
    262-69, 269n45, 274-81, 289. See
    also
Bios theoretikos
Contemptus mundi, V: 139, 157; VI: 68;
    VII: 258; VIII: 120
Contemptus vulgi, IV: 246
Contese eroiche, VI: 115, 139, 140
Contra bonam et debitam politiam,
    III: 253
Contracts, VII: 50, 66-67, 138
Contract theory, I: 110; II: 89n13; V: 31,
    35n, 57; VI: 145; VII: 137-38, 158, 159
Contractual origin of the state, II: 89n13
Contractus socialia (contract), V: 57
Contradictio in adjecto, VIII: 321, 332
Contrat Social (Rousseau), III: 93; VII:
    115
Conventicle Act of 1664, VI: 154
Conventions, Hume on, VII: 161
Conventuals, IV: 150
Conversi (lay brothers), II: 70
Conversio, IV: 224-2 8
Conversio (intention), V: 188, 198-99
Conversio in Deum, V: 198
Convivio (Dante), IV: 102n22, 210,
    210n, 212, 213
Cook, Thomas Ira, VI: 2
Copernicus: Bodin on, V: 181; and
    Bruno, VII: 205; Bruno on, V: 170-
    72, 170n81, 175n92; cosmology of,
    V: 137, 155-59; and Hellenic cosmos,
    V: 162; Kepler on, V: 156n52; theory
    of sun and relativity, VI: 184-89;
    Tycho de Brahe on, V: 166
Coptic Christianity, I: 177
Cordon sanitaire, III: 18
Corinthians, Epistle to, I: 174-75; II: 7-
    8; III: 46, 74; IV: 206, 207, 212n55,
    225-26, 226n, 235
Corinthians, letter to, V: 48
Cork, Earl of, VII: 109
Corporation Act of 1661, VI: 155
Corps de négocians (business
    community), VIII: 78-79
Corpus Aristotelicum, IV: 92
Corpus diaboli, I: 208-9; II: 92, 100; III:
    185; V: 202; VII: 286
Corpus Hermeticum, VIII: 20
Corpus juris canonici , II: 173
Corpus juris civilis, II: 152, 173
Corpus mixtum, I: 213
Corpus mysticum (mystical body):
    apocalyptic experience of, I: 30-
    32; augmentation of, III: 260-262;
    Augustine on, I: 213; Catholic
    doctrine on, II: 230n; and charismatic
    temporal power, III: 40-41;
    Christianitas as, IV: 117; compared
    with autonomy of persons,
    II: 134; compared with collectivist
    interpretation of humankind, II: 154;
    compared with sacrum imperium,
    III: 46; in Concordantia, III: 260-61n,
    266; and Council of Constance,
    III: 250-52; and differences of human
    gifts, I: 170-71; disruptions to and
    end of, II: 191, 195; III: 110; as
    divine-cosmic-human unity of
    all things in God, III: 24; and
    England, V: 73, 81; in Epistle to
    Hebrews,
I: 167-68; Franciscan
    Order as new corpus mysticum,
    III: 113; harmonious balance of
    powers in, VII: 76; hierarchical
    order of, I: 38; II: 199; III: 259-
    60; and institutional structure,
    IV: 132; V: 22; Joachitic Dux as
    head of, III: 242; Luther on, IV: 262;
    Machiavelli on, IV: 64; national
    bodies as, III: 11, 25; Nietzsche on,
    VII: 290; Paul on, I: 155, 216; II: 7-8;
    in Policraticus, II: 121; Rienzo on,
    III: 235, 237, 243; Rome as, III: 235,
    237; rulership within, II: 86, 157;
    secular corpus mysticum, III: 158-
    59, 162; theoretical formulations of,
    II: 62-63; Walram of Naumburg on,
    II: 87n; and weakness of humans,
    I: 170-71; IV: 140; and William of
    Ockham, III: 110, 120
Corpus mysticum Christi, VI: 42;
    VII: 232
Corpus mysticum Francisci, II: 110; VI:
    32
Corpus mysticum humanitatis, VI: 42
Corpus politicum (body politic), V: 67,
    68
Corsi, corso, VI: 88-89, 109, 116-19,
    121-26, 131, 134, 136-44, 147
Corsica, III: 240
Cosmas Indicopleustes, II: 7
Cosmic individual, V: 224
Cosmions, I: 18-22, 43-44, 225-33; II: 4,
    4n10, 6, 108; VII: 15-16, 18-19, 22,
    23, 25, 59-60, 170
Cosmography, V: 225-26
Cosmology: ancient cosmology,
    V: 158n56; biblical cosmology,
    V: 157; of Bodin, V: 158-62, 236-37,
    242-43; Copernican cosmology,
    V: 137, 155-59, 156n52, 162, 166,
    170-72, 170n81, 181; Ptolemaic
    cosmology, V: 157, 158, 166;
    Tychonian cosmology, V: 163-66,
   165n75
Cosmopolis:Cicero on, I: 124, 135, 199;
   Diogenes on, I: 78-79, 196, 200; open
   cosmopolis of wise men, I: 106; polis
   versus, I: 78-79, 116, 149; Rome as,
    I: 135, 137; and Stoicism, I: 98, 125,
   149, 199; II: 119
Cosmos: Bodin on cosmic hierarchy,
    V: 161-62; Bruno on, V: 171-75;
    as closed space, V: 137-38, 171;
    infinity of, V: 173-74, 174-75n92;
    and politics, I: 212, 227; spiritual
    substance throughout, V: 172-7 3;
    substance of, V: 172-73. See also
    Nature
Cosmos (Aristotle), V: 158n56
Cosmos empsychos, V: 162, 172
Costa, Uriel da, VII: 127
Cotton, John, VII: 87, 89
Council of Basel, III: 24, 250-52, 256,
    258; IV: 40
Council of Chalcedon, I: 176; II: 53
Council of Clerrnont, II: 72
Council of Constance, III: 248-50, 255;
    IV: 222
Council of Ephesus, I: 176, 183-84
Council of Ferrara/Florence, III: 250
Council of Florence, IV: 220
Council of Langres, IV: 154n
Council of Lateran, III: 171, 251
Council of Newton, VIII: 231
Council of Nicaea, I: 174n; IV: 240
Council of Pisa, III: 250
Council of Pisa/Siena, III: 250
Council of the Apostles, I: 174, 174n
Council of the French Church of
Orleans/Bourges, III: 256
Council of the North, VII: 108-9
Council of Trent, III: 111; V: 19; VII: 256,
    285
Council of Valence, IV: 154n
Council of Vienne, IV: 185
Counsel function, V: 193
Counter-Reformation: and astrology,
    V: 136; and Christian idea of
    universality, VI: 36; and conflicts
    caused by regional differences, VI: 14,
    33, 84; in Italy, VI: 85; and Jesuits,
    V: 17; and Machiavelli, IV: 31, 88; and
    pluralism of churches and
    communities, V: 21; and recuperative
    forces of Catholic Church, IV: 137; and
    Thirty Years War, V: 110
Cours de philosophie positive (Comte),
    VIII: 163, 170, 175-81, 195, 199-200,
    229
Courtenays, III: 60
Coutumes, III: 130; V: 245
Covell, William, V: 81n
Covenants: Hobbes on, VII: 67-68;
    between Israel and God, I: 109-17,
    205; V: 52; 53, 54, 244; of local
    religious groups in England in early
    seventeenth century, VII: 77, 79-80;
    between Puritans and God, VII: 6 9;
    Schelling on, VII: 223-25, 231, 236;
    Scottish National Covenant of 1638,
    VII: 80
Crainte (core of existence), VIII: 66
Cramaut, Simon, III: 253
Crassus, I: 188
Creation stories, IV: 159-63, 186-87
Creatum, VI: 108
Crécy, battle of, III: 68
Crede et manducasti ("Believe and
    Thou Hast Eaten"; Augustine),
    IV: 227
Crédit mobilier banking institutes,
    VIII: 230
Credo ut intelligam, VI: 60
Crescentian popes, II: 82
Crete, III: 222, 249
Crimen laesae majestatis Divinae,
    V: . 165
Criminality, IV: 77, 83, 156
Criminal law, VII: 163
Crisis and the Apocalypse of Man
    (Voegelin), IV: 239n, 255-56n16;
    VIII: 4, 5-32
Critias (Plato), IV: 119n
Critique (Kant), VI: 58
Croce, Benedetto, VI: 17, 87-90, 92n,
    102, 105, 132n
Cromwell, Oliver: and Catholic
    Church, VII: 113; dictatorship of,
    IV: 175, 176; and English Revolution,
    VII: 106, 107, 109, 110-14, 141; and
    franchise, VII: 83; Harrington's
    Oceana dedicated to, VII: 100; and
    Ireland, IV: 180; and Parliament,
    VII: 110, 112-14; politics of, VII:
    112-
    14; and Puritans, VII: 113; and
    readmission of Jews to England,
    VII: 127; strengths and weaknesses
    of, VII: 104; on will of God, VII: 110-
    12
—Work
    : Instrument of Government,
VII: 110
"Crown investigation, " II: 155
Crucé, Emeric, V: 112
Cruelty, Nietzsche on, VII: 276-77, 294
Crusades: and Albigensian War,
    II: 106, 155; IV: 136, 151; VIII: 19; and
    conquest of Holy Land, III: 62-
    64; as contact between East and
    West, I: 236; and crowned emperor,
    III: 207; in Cyprus, II: 216; in eastern
    Mediterranean, III: 60, 221-22; end
    of, III: 39; IV: 46; and expansion of
    Western civilization, II: 72-73; III: 40,
    44; against Hussites, III: 173, 251; IV:
    137; against Islam, III: 166n; and
    missionizing of Asia, III: 171; and
    order of Citeaux, II: 71; and Pope
    of Avignon, III: 165-66; of Richard
    I, III: 132; and rise of Holy Roman
    Empire, II: 29; and Saint Louis, III: 59,
    60; against Wends, III: 201
Cudworth, Ralph, VII: 201n3
Cuius regio, ejus religio, V: 215
Cujas, V: 39
Culte décadaire, VIII: 209
Culte de la Raison, VIII: 206, 209, 214
Culverwel, Nathaniel, VI: 167-69
Cupidity, VI: 111-12
Cura et tutela (care and protection),
    I: 204
Cura et tutela rei publicae (care and
    protection of the republic), I: 190
Cusa, Nicholas of. See Nicholas of
    Cusa
Cusanus. See Nicholas of Cusa
Custom, La Boetie on, V: 31-32, 36
Cycles: of civilization, V: 23; of empires,
    I: 115-26; first cycle of order against
    spirit, VII: 26, 153-54; of political
    forms, I: 125-26; IV: 62-65, 69-70,
    85-86, 119n; recurrent world cycles,
    V: 147-48; second cycle of reassertion
    of spirit, VII: 26, 155-57
Cynics, I: 69, 75-78, 97, 98, 149; II: 184;
    VII: 160, 228
Cyprus, II: 216-17; III: 222, 249
Cyrenaic school, I: 69, 75
Cyropaedia (Xenophon), IV: 82n
Cyrus, King, II: 44; IV: 58, 76, 81,
    81-82n66; V: 142
Czechoslovakia, III: 146, 174, 175, 200

Daedalus, I: 199
D'Ailly, Pierre, III: 251, 251n
D'Alembert, Jean Le Rond: an-
    ti medievalism of, VIII: 104-5; on
    "authoritative present, " VIII: 99-
    100; and catéchisme de morale,
    VIII: 97-98; on Christianity, VIII: 94-
    96; compared to Engels, VIII: 334; and
    dilemma of utilitarian morals,
    VIII: 96-98, 231; and disappearance of
    bios theoretikos, VIII: 92-94, 114; on
    Encyclopédie, VIII: 102-3; historical
    position of the Discours, VIII: 89-90; and
    idea of genealogy, VIII: 91-98; on
    need for new public cult to replace
    Christian symbolization, VIII: 6; new
    pouvoir spirituel of, VIII: 94-96; and
    principles of Encyclop‚die,
    VIII: 90-91; on progress, VIII: 98-106,
    100-101n10; on revolt and justice,
    VIII: 91-92; on rise of America and
    Russia, VIII: 104-6; and security
    against the future, VIII: 101-3; and
    security against the past, VIII: 100-
    101; on technology, VIII: 103-4
—Work
    : Discours préliminaire de
    1'Encyclopédie,
VIII: 88-106, 154
Dales, Richard C., II: 196n
Damian, Peter. See Peter Damian
Daniel, Book of, I: 121-22, 150, 168,
    221; II: 58; IV: 212n55; VIII: 225n72
Dante Alighieri I: as Apollonian
    imperium, IV: 11, 212; and
    Averroism, III: 67n, 75, 75-76n,
    81; compared with Luther, IV: 246;
    compared with Nicholas of Cusa,
    III: 266; compared with Piers
    Plowman,
III: 178, 181, 183-84;
    compared with Rienzo, III: 234, 238,
    242, 243; as conservative, III: 71;
    Engel-Janosi on, IV: 81n66; hierarchy
    of souls in Divina Commedia,
    III: 78-79; and human felicity, V: 199;
    as idealist, III: 70; on intellect and
    grace, IV: 208-14; on intellectual
    and hegemonic world organization,
    III: 76-77, 121, 239; on intramundane
    Rome, IV: 47n13; and isolation of
    political thinker, III: 66-68; and
    Joachitic tradition, III: 67n, 70, 73,
    79-81, 104, 113; and lingua volgare,
    III: 73; literary forms of, and symbols
    of authority, III: 72-74; Machiavelli
    on, IV: 72; as medieval figure, III: 37;
    on monarchy, VII: 194; on myth of
    the Italianità, III: 77-78; and new
    universal order, V: 192; Nietzsche
    on, VII: 292; quotation by, II: 126; as
    Renaissance figure, II: 107; III: 37-
    38; IV: 203; as romantic, III: 71;
    Schelling on, VII: 233; and separation
    of spirit from politics, III: 68, 105; and
    Siger-Thomas question, III: 67,
    67n; significance of, VII: 193, 194; and
    spiritual realism, I: 24, 25; III: 70-72;
    VII: 34; and symbols of
    authority, III: 72, 73-74; on temporal
    monarchy, III: 71-72, 74-75; and
    universal intellect, III: 75; IV: 114;
    vision of generally, III: 9-10; on world
    monarchy, III: 75-77, 100
—Works: Convivio, IV: 102n22, 210,
    210n, 212, 213; Divina Commedia,
    I: 34; III: 67-72, 67n, 73, 78-82,
    80nn7-8; IV: 210n; Inferno, III: 178;
    Letters, III: 72-73, 75, 81, 238;
    Monarchia, III: 71, 73, 74-78, 100;
    IV: 204; V: 140, 140n; Purgatorio,
    III: 78-82, 178, 181
Danton, Georges-Jacques, VIII: 206,
    209, 216
Darius, II: 44
Dark Ages, I: 101-2; II: 65-66
Darkness and Light, IV: 1 64-65, 179-80,
    190
Darré, Richard Walter, II: 46
Darwin, Charles, VII: 27, 156, 185
Darwinism, VI: 184, 213
Das an sich Potenzlose (being without
    potency), VII: 234
David, King, I: 109, 111; V: 53
David of Dinant, IV: 181
Davidsohn, Robert, III: 80n8
Davila, Enrico Caterino, VI: 8 3
Dawn of Day (Nietzsche), VII: 258-6l,
    266-67, 290-93
De acarnis aeternitatis (Cardano),
    VI: 105
De Anima (Aristotle), II: 184, 185;
    III: 75; IV: 237
De antiquissima Italorum sapientia
    (Vico). See Liber Metaphysicus
Death: Epicurean school on, I: 82-83;
    and fruitio in conspectu Dei, VII: 129;
    Hobbes on fear of, VII: 64-66, 131
Death of God, I: 35; VII: 136, 203,
    287-89; VIII: 23, 202
Debent civiliter intelligi , III: 251n
Decadence, Joachim on, II: 131
"Decadence" period in Italy, VI: 13,
    83-84, 96
De Christo et suo Adversario
    Antichristo
(Wycliffe), III: 192
Decius, I: 184, 185, 207, 208
De Civitate Dei Contra Paganos
    (Augustine), I: 209-10
Declaration of Independence, VII: 84-
    85
Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
    (Gibbon), IV: 138-39
Decline of the West (Spengler), I: 182;
    III: 138n; VIII: 146
De conceptione, II: 165, 166
De consideratione libri quinque ad
    Eugenium
(Bernard), II: 71-72; III: 51n
De Constantia Jurisprudentis (Vico),
    VI: 17, 91-92, 110. See also Diritto
    universale
(Vico)
De Constantia Philologiae (Vico), VI: 91
De Constantia Philosophiae (Vico),
    VI: 91
De Contrarietate Duorum Dominorum
   (Wycliffe), III: 188
Decretum Frequens, III: 247-48, 250
Decretum Gratianum, II: 13, 173-74
De decimis et aliis oneribus
    ecclesiasticis,
III: 248
"Dedivinization" (Entgötterung) , VI: 55
De Divisione Naturae (Erigena),
    IV: 152, 155, 156-57, 160-63, 179
De Dominio Civili (Wycliffe), III: 185,
    186-88
De Dominio Divino (Wycliffe), III: 185
De Ecclesia (Wycliffe), III: 188-89
De ecclesiastica potestate (Giles of
    Rome), III: 46-47, 50-53, 55, 84, 97
Defeat, myth of, II: 45-46
Defensio Henrici IV regis (Peter
    Crassus), II: 87n
Defensio Secunda (Milton), VII: 92-93
Defensor humanitatis, VI: 70
Defensor Pacis (Marsilius of Padua
    and John of Jandun), III: 12, 84-102,
    96-98nn, 105, 261
Defoe, Daniel, IV: 112
De Greeff, Etienne, VI: 47n9
De Haeretico Comburendo, III: 173
Deification of emperors, I: 190-94
Dei gratia, II: 157
De immortalitate animae (Pompon-
    azzi), IV: 91
De Imperatorum et Pontificum
    Potestate
(William of Ockham),
    III: 120, 126
De Intellectus Emendatione (Spinoza),
    VII: 127-28, 150
Deisidaimonia, I: 128; IV: 67n44
Deism, IV: 117, 139, 194; VI: 49, 51n,
    57, 76, 167, 182; VII: 203. See also
    God
Dei vassales, V: 54
De Jure Belli ac Pacis (Grotius),
    VII: 52-59
De juribus regni et imperii Romani
    (Lupold of Babenberg), III: 214-16
De juribus romani imperii (William of
    Ockham), III: 122
De la causa, del principio et uno
    (Bruno), VI: 105; VII: 183n5
De 1'esprit (Helvétius), VIII: 43-44,45,
    68, 75-77
De 1'esprit des Lois (Montesquieu),
    VII: 163-66, 172
De 1'homme (Helvétius), VIII: 47-48,
    75, 77-80
Deliberatio Papae (Innocent III),
    II: 174-77
Delphic Amphictyony, I: 88
Demeter mysteries, VII: 228
Demetrius of Phalerum, I: 123
Demi-politiques, VIII: 74
Demiurge, IV: 165, 186, 186n25
Democracy and democratization,
    I: 73, 94, 109-11; III: 144-45; IV: 62;
    V: 191; VI: 149; VII: 102-3, 156, 157;
    VIII: 252-53, 279
"Democracy of cupidity, " IV: 125
Democritus, 1: 82, 83
De Monarchia (Dante), III: 71, 73,
    74-78, 100; IV: 204; V: 140, 140n
Démonomanie, V: 206
Démonomanie des sorciers (Bodin),
    V: 186, 197, 202, 205-7
Demosthenes, I: 69, 72
De Motu (Berkeley), VI: 195-96
Dempf, Alois: on Civitas Dei,
   
I: 213, 220; on Cusa, III: 264n; on
    monarchiopants, III: 252; IV: 35;
    on old law, II: 229; on pactum ,
    II: 89n13; on political interpretations
    of medieval world, II: 180; on
    submissiveness and power, II: 194;
    Voegelin on generally, I: 6
—Work
    s: Sacrum Imperium, II: 60n;
    III: 5, 85n2, 119n15, 264n; VI: 7;
    Selbstkritik der Philosophie und
    vergleichende Philosophiegeschichte
    im Umriss,
IV: 205n46
Dem Sonnengott (Hölderlin), VII: 243
De Natura Legis Naturae, III: 156
De naturalibus naturaliter, II: 189
Denifle, Heinrich, IV: 267, 269
Denkresultate (intellectual results),
    VII: 19
Denmark, III: 201, 227
De nominibus Dei (Dionysius
    Areopagita), V: 218
De Officio Regis (Wycliffe), III: 169, 190
De Orbo Novo (Peter Martyr), IV: 111
De ortu et auctoritate imperii Romani
    (Enea Silvio), III: 252n
De pauperie Salvatoris (Fitzralph),
    III: 169, 185
De periculis novissimorum temporum
   
(William of Saint Amour), II: 199-2O0
Deposition of heretical ruler, V: 65-66
De Potestate Papae (Wycliffe), III: 191-
    92
De potestate summi pontificis in rebus
    temporalibus
(Cardinal Bellarmine),
    III: 112
Depravari (corrupted), V: 221-22
De principatibus (Machiavelli). See
    Principe (Prince)
(Machiavelli)
De profundis, IV: 76
Derailments, VII: 259, 259n21
De recuperatione terre sancte (Dubois),
    III: 61-65, 63-64n
De regimine principum (Giles of
    Rome), III: 48-49
De regimine principum (Thomas
    Aquinas), II: 212, 216-17, 221-22;
    IV: 111
De Rerum Natura (Lucretius), I: 82
Derivative force (vis derivativa),
    VI: 201-2
Der schalkichte Heide, IV: 259
De sacramentis fidei Christiana (Hugh
    of Saint Victor), III: 47
De sancta trinitate et operibus eius
    (Rupert of Deutz), II: 127
Descartes, René: on body-mind split,
    VII: 200; and Comte, VIII: 195; deism
    of, VI: 57; VII: 203; on ego
    cogitans, VII: 204, 206; on human
    nature, IV: 256; on mathematics,
    V: 156, 176; and More, VI: 192, 196; on
    movement, VI: 196, 200n67; on nature,
    VII: 205-6; Pascal on,
    VII: 184; on place of a body, VI: 198;
    Schelling on, I: 28; VI: 103; VII: 200,
    204, 206; significance of, VI: 102; VIII:
    118; skepticism of, VII: 206,
    288; and spiritual core of human
    personality, VII: 29; on "spontaneous
    reproduction," VIII: 177; and tabula
    rasa, VII: 47, 206; and tenable
    philosophy of substance, VII: 239;
    Vico on, I: 28; VI: 16, 16n, 91, 93-95,
    98, 99, 102, 104, 107-8, 128, 145, See
    also
Cartesianism
—Works: Discours de la méthode,
    VI: 94; VIII: 90; Meditations, VI: 107-
    8; Principia, VI: 200, 202n74
    Désir du pouvoir (passion for power),
    VIII: 56-59
Despoty, Montesquieu on, VII: 168
De Tranquillitate Animi (Seneca),
    I: 203
De Tyranno (Salutati), IV: 40-41
De unitate intellectus contra
Averroistas
(Albertus Magnus),
    II: 179
De unitate intellectus contra
Averroistas
(Thomas Aquinas),
    II: 179
De universi juris uno principio et
    fine uno
(Vico), VI: 91, 110. See also
    Diritto universale (Vico)
Deus absconditus, VII: 287
Deusdedit, Cardinal, II: 84n6
Deus et dominus noster (living god and
    master), I: 194
Deus Optimus Maximus, V: 189, 238
Deutero-Isaiah, I: 116-19, 150, 153-54;
    III: 74
Deuteronomy, V: 51
Deutsche Ideologie (Marx), VIII: 358n68
Deux sources de la morale et de la
    religion
(Bergson), VIII: 138-39
De varietate fortunae (Poggio), IV: 51n
De Vaux, Clotilde, VIII: 163, 174, 182,
    184, 187-91, 195
Devil. See Civitas diaboli (city of the
    devil); Corpus diaboli; Ecclesia
    diaboli;
Satan
Devotio moderna, III: 17
Dewey, John, I: 94
DeWitt, Jan, VII: 134
Diadochic empires, I: 103, 106, 120,
    221, 236
Dialectical materialism, VI: 114; VII: 7;
    VIII: 14, 155, 320-39
Dialectics: definition of, VIII: 321; of
    Hegel, VII: 213-14, 266; VIII: 321,
    322-24; of Marx, VII: 7; VIII: 320-39;
    of Schelling, VII: 212, 213, 213n19
Dialoghi delle science nuove (Galileo),
    VI: 18, 93
Dialogus (William of Ockham),
    III: 118n14, 120, 121, 122, 124
Diana of Ephesus, I: 184
Dicaearchus of Messana, I: 126
Dichotomies, V: 56, 58
Dictatus papae (Gregory VII), II: 87-88
Dictionnaire philosophique (Voltaire),
    VI: 57, 58, 60-61
Diderot, Denis, IV: 202, 237; VIII: 90,
    103, 114, 334
Diego Lainez, V: 62
Dienstbarer Knecht (serf), IV: 252
Diet of Frankfurt, III: 83
Diet of Mainz, III: 256
Diet of Metz, III: 205
Diet of Nuremberg, III: 205
Diet of Ratisbon, V: 19
Diet of Roncaglia, II: 172
Dieu et l'état (Bakunin), VIII: 299-302,
    299n57
Differentiae specificae, V: 214
Digest (Justinian), I: 96; II: 166, 170, 171
Diggers, IV: 139; VII: 97-100, 148
Dignitas concessa, II: 120n, 157
Dignus est operarius cibo suo (servant
    is worth his living), III: 162
Dikaerchos, V: 247n102
Dilettantism, VI: 212-13. See also
Philosophical dilettantism
Dilthey, Wilhelm, VI: 77, l00
Ding-an-sich ("thing-in-itself"),
    III: 107; V: 179; VII: 206; VIII: 335,
    371
Dio, I: 187
Diocletian, I: 179, 186, 207, 208; II: 56;
    VIII: 313n7
Diogenes, I: 10, 75-79, 78n, 82, 96, 134, 196,
    199, 200
Dionis Hid Divinite, III: 177
Dionysius Areopagita (Pseudo-
    Dionysius):and conversio in
    Diem
and imitatio Dei, V: 198-
    201; Cusa on, III: 257, 259; and
    Eastern influences, IV: 10, 151-57;
    hierarchicalism of, I: 37; II: 201,
    202; III: 45-48, 47-48nn, 259;
    V: 203; and imago Dei, IV: 202;
    V: 66-67; influence of, on Cloud of
    Unknowing,
III: 177; influence of,
    on Eckhart, IV: 184; influence of, on
    medieval theory of law and politics,
    II: 171; mystical theology of, IV: 201;
    Saint Thomas on, V: 67; translations
    of, III: 176
—Work
    : De nominbus Dei , V: 218
Dionysus, VII: 228, 230-33, 241, 243
Dionysus cult, I: 72, 89
Diotima, I: 236
Diotogenes, I: 105-6
Directeur de l'âme, VII: 190
Diritto universale (Vico), VI: 16,
    16n, 91, 110, 111, 114-18
Disciplinarian schisms in Western
    Church, I: 208-9
Discordia, III: 215
Discorsi sopra la prima deca di Tito
    Livio (Machiavelli), IV: 6, 56, 59-71, 73, 84; V: 220
Discours (Diderot), VIII: 334
Discours de la méthode (Descartes),
    VI: 94; VIII: 90
Discourse de la servitude volontaire
    (La Boétie), I: 230; V: 25, 28-39, 28n4,
    40, 42; VIII: 91
Discourse of the Light of Nature
    (Culverwel), VI: 167-69
Discourse on Universal History
    (Bossuet), VI: 9, 35-38; VIII: 110
Discourses en Sorbonne (Turgot),
    VIII: 106, 108, 114, 118
Discourses on Universal History
    (Turgot), VIII: 106, 110, 119n33
Discours préliminaire (Comte),
    VIII: 186-87, 191-92
Discours préliminaire de l'Encyclo-
    pédie
(d'Alembert), VIII: 88-106,
    154
Discours sur l'ensemble du positivisme
(Comte), VIII: 178


NEXT PART Of INDEX (Discours to Ezra)
BACK TO TOP
BACK TO BIBLIOGRAPHY
BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS
VOEGELIN MAIN PAGE

-->