VOL 3   The History of the Race Idea

  From Ray to Carus
 

Contents

Editor's Introduction xi
Foreword 1
Introduction 3
  §1. Primal Images and Primal Ways of Seeing 3
  §2. Thought Images and Types 12
  §3. History and the Present 18
PART  1
SPECIES AND RACE IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
 
1. Exposition of the Species Problem 29
  §1. Linnaeus' Concept of Species 29
  §2. The Natural Method (Ray) 31
  §3. Natural System and Scholastic System (Ray to Kant) 34
  §4. The Essence (Ray to Goethe) 38
  §5. Further Illumination of the Species Problem (Ray) 41
2. Man's Position in the System of Nature 44
  §1. Buffon 45
  §2. Linnaeus 50
3. Travelogues 54
4. The Classification of Races: Buffon 57
  §1. Espèce and variété 57
  §2. The Norm and the Exotic 58
  §3. Race 60
  §4. Causes of Differences Among the Races 61
  §5. The Unified Nature of Man 63
5. The Classification of Races: Herder 66
6. The Classification of Races: Blumenbach and Kant 73
7. On the History of the Word Race 80
 
PART  II
THE INTERNALIZATION OF BODY AND PERSON
 
A. THE INTERNALIZATION OF THE BODY
8. Preformation and Epigenesis 93
9. The Organism and the Animal in Itself: Wolff's Theoria Generationis 99
  § 1. Vis essentialis and solidescibilitas 99
  §2. Conception as a Borderline Case of Nourishment 101
  §3. The Word Organism in the Sense of Mechanism ;
Preliminaries for the Change in Meaning
102
  §4. Preexistence of the Animal in Itself┬ŚMechanistic
and Animalistic Functions
103
  §5. Summarizing Characterization 105
10. Reinterpretation of Mechanism as Organism 107
  §1. Leibniz 107
  §2. Oken 111
11. Infinite Series and Finitization 115
  §1. Buffon 117
  §2. Leibniz 119
12. Inner Form and Formative Drive 122
  §1. Inner Form (Buffon) 122
  §2. The Formative Drive (Blumenbach) 123
13. The Concept of the Organism in the Critique of Judgment 127
14. The Unfolding of the World of Organic Forms 131
  § 1. The Diversity of Living Forms as a Real Continuum
of Reason (Leibniz)
133
  §2. The Diversity of Living Forms Under the Regulative
Idea of the Continuum (Kant)
135
  §3. The Transcendent Factual Order of the Series
(Herder, Goethe)
137
  §4. The Immanent Factual Order of the Series (Kant) 140
  §5. Life as Primary Phenomenon 142
B. THE INTERNALIZATION OF THE PERSON
15. Immortality of the Person and Perfection of Generic Reason 147
16. The Problem of the Finite Person; Specialization by the
Division of Labor; the Elite and the Masses
154
17. The Person of Goethe as Ideal; Schiller's Letters
on the Aesthetic Education of Man
159
18. Wilhelm von Humboldt's Concept of Individuality;
The Force of Spirit
164
19. Goethe's Person in the Work of Carus;
The State of Being Well-Born
169
20. Carus' Race Theory 173
Index 181


YOU CAN SEARCH THIS BOOK'S INDEX

BACK TO BIBLIOGRAPHY

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS

VOEGELIN MAIN PAGE

NEXT TABLE OF CONTENTS