ORDER AND HISTORY


Vol 5   In Search of Order
(CW VOL 18)

Table of Contents

[Note: Paging for the original 1987 edition is shown in brackets. ]
Editor's Introduction   1
Foreword
Lissy Voegelin
 13   [xv]
Introduction
Ellis Sandoz
 15   [1]
Chapter 1 The Beginning of the Beginning  27   [13]
Chapter 2 Reflective Distance vs. Reflective Identity  63   [48]
Epilogue
Jürgen Gebhardt
125   [109]
Index 137   [119]

Analytical Table of Contents

Introduction

15      [1]

Chapter 1:  The Beginning of the Beginning

27      [3]
§1. Where Does The Beginning Begin? 27      [12]
Beginning and End The Whole and the Word Common Language and Philosopher's Language
§ 2. The Paradox of Consciousness 28      [14]
Intentionality and Luminosity Thing-Reality and It-Reality
§3. The Complex of Consciousness-Reality-Language 31      [16]
Conventional and Natural Language Concept and Symbol
§4. The Beginning of Genesis I 33      [19]
The Tension in the It Word and Waste
Digression on Conventional Misunderstandings 34      [20]
(1) Psychologies of Projection 34      [20]
(2) Comparative Religion 35      [21]
(3) Doctrinal Exegesis 36      [21]
§5. The True Story 38      [23]
The Social Field of Truth The Historical Field of Truth The Authority of the Story The Story as Narrative and Event
§6. The Story Begins in the Middle 41      [27]
The Platonic Metaxy
§7. The Plurality of Middles 43      [29]
The One It-Story and the Plurality of Episodes The Beginning, the End, and the Beyond The Parousia of the Beyond, the Flux of Presence, the Indelible Present True Immortality and Intermediate Immortality of the Gods
§8. Definite Thingness and Indefinite Diversification 46      [31]
§9. Formative Parousia and Deformation 47      [33]
The Correlation Between the Story of Formation and the Story of Deformation
§10. Existential Resistance 49      [35]
The Motives of Resistance The Separation of "Reality" and "Beyond" The Magic Alternatives
§11. Imagination 51      [37]
Its Paradoxic Structure Assertive and Self-Assertive Imagination The Image of the World Creates the World The Common Ground of Resistance to Truth and Resistance to Untruth
§12. The Symbols Reflective Distance-Remembrance-Oblivion 54      [40]
1. Their Validity in the Context of the Meditation 56      [41]
2. Their Validity in the Context of Historical Equivalences 57      [42]
3. Reflective Distance 58      [44]
Digression on Rescue of Symbols 59      [44]

Chapter 2:  Reflective Distance vs. Reflective Identity

63      [48]
§1. The German Revolution of ConsciousnesS 63      [48]
The Formative Purpose and the Deformative Tradition The Ambiguities of Consciousness Speculative Imagination Revolutionary Consciousness The Self-Interpretation The Ambiguities of Resistance
§2. Hegel I 69      [54]
1. System vs. Existential Tension 69      [54]
2. The Ambiguity of Dialectics 70      [55]
3. The Deformation of the Periagoge 71      [56]
4. The Inversion of Formation-Deformation 71      [56]
5. Pronominal Language 72      [57]
6. Hegel's Pronomina and Plato's Nomina 73      [58]
7. The Inversion of Consciousness into Unconsciousness 74      [58]
8. The Public Unconscious (Jung-Kerényi) 74      [59]
9. The Act of Imaginative Oblivion 76      [61]
10. The Self-Analysis of Activist Consciousness 77      [62]
11. The Trauma of the Orthodox Environment 79      [63]
12. God: The Senseless Sound 80      [64]
13. Ambiguity and Paradoxic Validity 81      [65]
14. God: The Experience of His Death 81      [66]
15. Mortality and Immortality of the Gods 83      [67]
16. The Language of the Gods: Death-Parousia-Remembrance 84      [68]
§3. Hesiod's Mnemosyne 86      [70]
The Three Invocations of the Muses of the Theogony 86      [70]
1. The Parousia of the Muses Mediation of Divine Truth 86      [70]
2. The Muses Remember Their Divinity to the Gods 87      [71]
3. The Tale of the Divine Things ( ta eonta ) 89      [73]
4. The Hesiodian Vision of Reality 92      [76]
§4. Remembrance of Reality 101     [85]
1. From the Seer to the Singer (Homer-Hesiod) Ta Eonta 101     [85]
2. The Knowing Man (Parmenides) To Eon 102     [86]
3. The Philosopher (Plato) To Pan 104     [87]
ยง 5. Plato's Timaeus 108     [91]
1. The Tensional Symbols 108     [91]
2. The Tensions and Their Poles 109     [92]
3. The Levels of Paradoxic Language The Constant and the Super-Constant 110     [92]
4. The One Cosmos 111     [94]
5. Monosis and Monogenesis 112     [96]
6. The Beyond and Its Parousia 113     [96]
7. The Oneness of Divine Reality and the One God 114     [97]
8. The One God and the Many Gods 115     [98]
9. The Disorder of Things Space 116     [99]
10. The Meditative Procedure 117     [100]
11. The Mutual Illumination of Symbols Things and Non-Things 117     [100]
12. Untitled 120     [103]
[12] 123

		

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